Question of the Week

Highlighted questions from the Education Center

[Question of the Week] Why is a woodpecker knocking on the cedar shingles of my house and how do I make it stop?

Published Jan 2, 2018
Answered by Emma Erler, Education Center Coordinator, UNH Cooperative Extension Q: A woodpecker has been knocking on the cedar shingles of my house. Can you tell me why it’s doing this and what I can do to make it stop? More

[Question of the Week] How can I insulate my unheated greenhouse during the winter?

Published Dec 29, 2017
Many tender perennials can be held over the winter so long as they are kept above freezing in a brightly lit spot. Even an unheated greenhouse can provide the perfect conditions for overwintering herbs such as lavender, sage and rosemary provided it is properly located and insulated. More

[Question of the Week] I just received a load of firewood, and I can’t tell if it has been seasoned or not. Is there a good way to tell if it is okay to burn?

Published Dec 19, 2017
Answered by Emma Erler, Education Center Coordinator, UNH Cooperative Extension Wood burned inside the home should always be dry and seasoned for at least 6-12 months. Wood burns most efficiently when the moisture content is at 20% or less. Damp wood burns at a cooler temperature, resulting in incomplete combustion, more smoke, and dangerous creosote build-up in the chimney (a fire hazard). Excess wood smoke can decrease air quality both inside and outside the home, contributing to breathing issues. In short, avoid burning unseasoned wood! More

[Question of the Week] How do I protect my ENDLESS SUMMER Hydrangea over the winter?

Published Dec 14, 2017
Question: I have an ENDLESS SUMMER Hydrangea that never blooms. Is there something I should be doing to protect it for the winter? More

[Question of the Week] What can I do to reduce the risk of my Christmas tree catching on fire?

Published Dec 5, 2017
By Emma Erler, Education Center Program Coordinator, UNH Cooperative Extension While house fires starting with Christmas trees are rare, they do occur every season. You can reduce your risk at home by following a few simple guidelines when buying, caring for, and decorating the tree. More
Quercus rubra (Red oak) pictured. This is one of our native oaks that is still holding onto its leaves.

[Question of the Week] Why do my oak trees hold on to their leaves longer than other trees?

Published Nov 28, 2017
Answered by Emma Erler, Education Center Program Coordinator, UNH Cooperative Extension All trees lose their leaves, but they have different strategies for when and how they do it. Even conifers shed their leaves, although they retain them for more than a year. Deciduous trees have evolved leaves that maximize photosynthesis in the summer months but are very susceptible to damage from environmental extremes such as drought and freezing temperatures. To combat this, deciduous trees drop their leaves in the fall, reducing the amount of water the trees lose in the winter. More

Winterizing Your Garden Tools

Published Oct 31, 2017

Blueberries for the Home Garden

Published Apr 18, 2017
By Jeremy DeLisle, UNH Cooperative Extension Education Center Program Coordinator Q: My kids love blueberries and I’d like to grow them at home. Could you offer some advice? – Sarah B, Tilton, NH  More

Emerging Bulbs and Cold Weather

Published Mar 28, 2017
UNH Cooperative Extension Info Line Question of the Week Q. The daffodils next to my house are up about 2 inches. Will more snow damage them? More

An Idea that Might Make You Rethink Your Landscape

Published Mar 14, 2017
By Jeremy DeLisle, UNH Cooperative Extension Education Center Program Coordinator Foodscaping, or edible landscaping, is the integration of food-producing plants and ornamentals in your yard. It is a practical and innovative way for you to grow more food, use space efficiently and create colorful and interesting landscape designs. More

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