July 2, 2020
After an unusually cool and rainy spring, much of New Hampshire is now experiencing a moderate drought. In response, many municipalities and public water systems have implemented voluntary or mandatory outdoor water use restrictions. Those with private wells also have to be cautious with how they use water. Recent rains certainly help, but they won’t entirely make up the deficit.

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Japanese Knotweed (Reynoutria japonica) is an extremely fast growing invasive herbaceous plant in the buckwheat family (Polygonaceae)....

The browned leaves and dead branches are the result of winter injury, likely sustained during the very cold temperatures we had back in...

By the sound of things, eastern chipmunks have taken up residence in your garden. Chipmunks are eight to 10 inches long, have five long...

As a result of increasing interest in craft breweries for community revitalization in New Hampshire, the Community and Economic Development...

Conventional wisdom tells us that earthworms are good for the soil. They improve soil drainage and aeration, increase nutrient availability...

July 2, 2020

After an unusually cool and rainy spring, much of New Hampshire is now experiencing a moderate...

June 30, 2020

Listen Now Over-Informed on IPM · 022 SWD Monitoring NOTES Instructions on salt float method:...

June 30, 2020

UNH Extension is working with the NH Winery Association to try to get an accurate assessment of how...

June 30, 2020

A new report has been confirmed this summer in Grafton County, by our state entomologist, Piera...

June 29, 2020

Get ready to engage your community this summer and fall. Community leaders and volunteers have...

June 25, 2020

There is something wonderful about eating the very first ripe, juicy tomato of the season. The...

June 24, 2020

The death of George Floyd and the numerous events that have been put into motion across our country...

June 23, 2020

  Fire blight outbreaks have been reported from several orchards around NH. The outbreaks likely...

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