Fire blight on apple. Photo by William Jacobi, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org

Webinar - Fire Blight IPM Using Non-Antibiotic Control Methods

Wed, 10/09/2019

2:00pm - 3:00pm

This webinar is about using non-antibiotic controls for fire blight on apples and pears.

Fire blight is a devastating disease of apple and pear caused by a bacterial pathogen. The disease is traditionally controlled with antibiotics, but in this webinar, you will learn about a non-antibiotic alternative—an integrated method that uses a biological control and a surface sterilant. Whether you are an orchard grower who wants to market your fruits as antibiotic-free, or an arborist or landscape practitioner who cannot use antibiotics at private homes and schools, this webinar may provide a solution for you.

The speakers are passionate about helping growers with disease issues and there will be plenty of time for Q&A.

Register: https://cornell.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_gQY5VEWuS2-w-m_Ce4Khhw

Presenters

Quan Zeng, Agricultural Scientist, Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station

PhD: University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (2011) Postdoctoral training: Michigan State University

Zeng’s research focuses on developing new and improved bacterial plant disease management solutions through the study of biology, ecology, and genetics of plant pathogens.

 

Dan Cooley, Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst 

PhD: University of Massachusetts Amherst

Cooley’s career in applied research, teaching, and extension has focused on management of fruit diseases, particularly those afflicting apples. Recent projects include collaborating on a smartphone app for integrated pest management of fruit crops, MyIPM, and developing resources to educate growers and the public about climate change impacts on New England agriculture.

Neil Schultes, Agricultural Scientist, Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station

PhD: Harvard Medical School (1990) Postdoctoral training: Yale University

Schultes’s research explores the role of metabolite transport in plants and microbial pathogens.

 

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