Good Forestry in the Granite State:
Recommended Voluntary Forest Management Practices for New Hampshire
Table of Contents >>3.3 Aesthetics of Skid Trails, Truck Roads and Landings << 3.4 Harvesting in High-Use Recreation Areas >> 3.5 Soil Productivity

3.4 TIMBER HARVESTING IN HIGH-USE RECREATION AREAS

BACKGROUND

Minimizing conflicts between timber harvesting and recreational use can leave visitors with a positive impression of forest management.

The primary exposure many people have to timber harvesting occurs when they're hiking, camping, mountain biking, wildlife viewing, horseback riding, hunting, fishing, or enjoying other recreational activities on managed lands. Whether harvesting near trails on their own land or harvesting in proximity to recreational areas on adjacent lands, a landowner’s actions can significantly affect the public’s perception of harvesting, for better or for worse. Attention to the impact of harvesting on recreational uses can enhance the public’s recreational experience and create a positive impression of forest management.

OBJECTIVE

Minimize the visual and audible impacts of timber harvesting in or near areas used for recreation.

CONSIDERATIONS

RECOMMENDED PRACTICES

CROSS REFERENCES

1.5 Staying Safe Working in the Woods; 3.1 Timber Harvesting Systems; 3.2 Logging Aesthetics; 3.3 Aesthetics of Truck Roads, Skid Trails and Landings; 7.8 Cultural Resources.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Jones, G. T. 1993. A Guide to Logging Aesthetics: Practical Tips for Loggers, Foresters, and Landowners. Natural Resource, Agriculture, and Engineering Service. NRAES-60. NRAES Cooperative Extension, Ithaca, N.Y. 28 p.

N.H. Dept. of Resources and Economic Development, Division of Forests and Lands. 2004. Best Management Practices for Erosion Control on Timber Harvesting Operations in New Hampshire. State of New Hampshire. http://extension.unh.edu/resources/files/Resource000247_Rep266.pdf Accessed March 13, 2010.

3.3 Aesthetics of Skid Trails, Truck Roads and Landings << 3.4 Harvesting in High-Use Recreation Areas >> 3.5 Soil Productivity

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