Good Forestry in the Granite State:
Recommended Voluntary Forest Management Practices for New Hampshire
Table of Contents >>  6.5 Permanent Openings << 6.6 Temporary Openings Created by Forest Management >> 6.7 Aspen Management

6.6 TEMPORARY OPENINGS CREATED BY FOREST MANAGEMENT

BACKGROUND

Shrubland wildlife species are rapidly declining in New England.

Many wildlife species such as black racer and milk snakes, woodcock, brown thrasher, whip-poor-will, chestnut-sided warbler, common yellowthroat, eastern towhee, indigo bunting, New England cottontail, meadow vole, and meadow jumping mouse require grass- and shrub-dominated early successional habitat for shelter and forage throughout the year. Early successional wildlife habitats (young trees and shrubs) have become very uncommon in much of the northeast, largely due to the maturation of the forests. These habitats are ephemeral and created through some type of human or natural disturbance (e.g., forest management clearcuts, periodic hurricanes, fire, beaver activity, and insects). Coastal and valley-bottom forests, historically exposed to disturbances from windthrow and fire are far less available as habitat today due to development and fire suppression. Today’s forests are often shaped by public desire to view extensive, unbroken forests in all directions, making the presence of big patches and gaps of vibrant shrubby forest regeneration created through even-aged management far less likely on the landscape.

OBJECTIVE

Provide a sufficient range of early successional habitat through regenerating shade-intolerant forest types.

CONSIDERATIONS

RECOMMENDED PRACTICES

CROSS REFERENCES

2.3 Regeneration Methods; 6.5 Permanent Openings; 6.7 Aspen Management; 6.8 Beaver-Created Openings; 7.4 Pine Barrens.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

DeGraaf, R., M. Yamasaki, W. B. Leak, and A. M. Lester. 2006. Technical Guide to Forest Wildlife Habitat Management in New England. University of Vermont Press and University Press of New England, Burlington, Vt. 305 p.

6.5 Permanent Openings << 6.6 Temporary Openings Created by Forest Management >> 6.7 Aspen Management

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