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Gardens and Landscapes


Adaptive Gardening: Gardening with Limitations


Backyard Livestock

About the Cuts - Pig    

An example of what you’d approximately get from a typical 250 lb. (live weight) whole pig.

Feeding Colostrum Replacers    

management practices for the proper use of colostrum replacer with dairy calves

Hay Quality    
Guide to quality hay for livestock.
History of Chicken Flocks in the US    

Information on raising backyard poultry. Includes topics such as housing and management practices, care of eggs, nutrition requirements, disease and parasite control, chicken terms and additional sources of information.

Producing Eggs     
Small flock Poultry management; Cannibalism    

Fact sheet on prevention and control of cannibalism in small poultry flocks.

Small Flock Poultry Management; Disease    

An introduction to Poultry Disease and discussion of causes of diseases

Small Flock Poultry Management; External Parasites    

Identification and Management of common External Parasites of Small Poultry Flocks.

Small Flock Poultry Management; Marek's Disease    

Fact sheet on Marek's Disease a common disease of small poultry flocks.

Small Flock Poultry Management; Newcastle Disease    

Fact Sheet on the causes and prevention of Newcastle disease of poultry.

Small Flock Poultry Management; Pullorum Disease and Fowl Typhoid    

Fact Sheet on Pullorum and Fowl Typhoid, two diseases of importance to the small flock.

Small Flock Poultry Management;Bumblefoot    

Bumblefoot disorder of poultry - symptoms, causes and treatment.

Small Flock Poultry ManagementSeries; Brooding Chicks    

Fact Sheet for getting day-old chicks off to a good start.

Small Flock Poultry Mangement; Internal Parasites    

Fact sheet on internal parasites in small flocks.

Wild Bird Food Recipe    

Recipe for wild bird food


Education Center Handbooks

Master Gardener Manual    

Master Gardener Manual


Flowers

Flowering Calendar for Wildflower Species in Southern New Hampshire    

Phenology chart for selecting pollinator plants to bloom all season long

Lily Leaf Beetle    
Description, life-cycle and control of the Lily Leaf Beetle on garden lilies
Overwintering Geraniums    

Geraniums are one of the most outstanding plants grown in the home garden. They are a very popular plant, so much so that the Penn State Cooperative Extension Service says that $1.00 out of every $5.00 spent on bedding plants in the United States is for geraniums. Many gardeners like to keep their geraniums from one year to the next.

Peonies    

I moved into a home with older established flower beds last year.  I've identified several peonies, but none flowered last year.  What can I do this year to ensure I get blossoms?

Poinsettias: Care and Reflowering    

A brief history of poinsettias and instructions on the process of reflowering a plant year after year.

Potted Geraniums    

The potted geraniums I brought in for the winter are dropping their leaves. What’s going on?

Winter Bulbs    

Winter Bulbs

Winter Protection of Roses    

Winter Protection of Roses - fact sheet.

Witch Hazel    

What is the earliest spring-blooming tree or shrub that I can buy?


Forage Crops

Hay and Haylage    
Haymaking    
Guide to hay making.

General Gardening

A Bit about Bulbs    

Night temperatures are cool, the air is almost crisp. The vegetable harvest is tapering off and green foliage is starting to change to beautiful shades of red and yellow. There are many signs that tell us that fall is here. But this year, instead of dreading a long, cold winter, why not make the most of this glorious season? Gardening is not finished—for that matter, it never is! There is always something to do, and right now is the time to plant spring-flowering bulbs.

A Guide to Using Wood Ash as an Agricultural Soil Amendment    

Wood ash contains significant amounts of potassium and calcium, while providing smaller amounts of phosphorous and magnesium.

DEET    
Fall Leaves    

What can I do with all the fall leaves I’ve raked up?

Five Steps to Food Safe Fruit and Vegetable Home Gardening     
This two-page fact sheet highlights five steps home gardeners can take to keep food safe.
Flowering Calendar for Wildflower Species in Southern New Hampshire    

Phenology chart for selecting pollinator plants to bloom all season long

Garden Mulches    
Garden to Table: Five Steps to Food Safe Fruit and Vegetable Home Gardening    
This longer booklet form of the two-page fact sheet - Five Steps to Food Safe Fruit and Vegetable Home Gardening - provides in-depth food safety information and fruit/vegetable storage charts for the home gardener.
Garden to Table: Storing Fresh Garden Produce    
This two-page fact sheet/chart for the home gardener provides information on fruit and vegetable storage methods, times, and tips. 
Garlic    

I’d like to grow some garlic, and I’ve heard that mid-October is the traditional planting time.If so, how do I go about it?

Guidelines for Using Animal Manures & Manure-Based Composts in the Garden    

Animal manures and animal manure-based composts are rich in plant nutrients such as Nitrogen (N), Phosphorous (P) and Potassium (K) and provide organic matter that conditions the soil, so they make excellent soil amendments for the home gardener. However, it is important to use them effectively and safely.

Integrated Pest Management    
What is Integrated Pest Management?
Japanese Knotweed    

We have a plant that looks like bamboo taking over our yard. What can we do?

Lead Screening for NH Soils: Minimizing Health Risks    

Lead is a naturally occurring element that is present in all soils at very low concentrations of less than 50 parts per million (ppm). Elevated levels of lead in the soil are usually due to contamination.

Mixing Small Amounts of Pesticides    
Home Garden Equivalents
NH Frost Dates    
October’s the Time to Dig and Store Summer Bulbs    

The difference between hardy and tender bulbous plants is a matter of geography, not underground structure. Plants originally developed bulbs, corms, and tubers to help them survive conditions like cold and drought. In cold-climate gardens many tender bulbous plants which can’t survive extremely low soil temperatures can be lifted and brought indoors for their winter’s rest. Some of the varieties commonly lifted and stored indoors inNew Englandare tuberous begonias, dahlias, cannas, caladium, elephant’s ears and gladiolus. 

Poison Ivy Q & A    

How can I control poison ivy without using chemical herbicides?

Purchasing Topsoil    

Fact sheet on purchasing topsoil

Question of the Week-Goldenrod    

I have terrible allergies in late summer. Are they caused by goldenrod?

Rain Gardens    

What exactly does a rain garden do?

Slime Molds    
Slow-Release Fertilizers for Home Gardens and Landscapes    

Information on comparing and choosing  slow-release fertilizers for your garden or landscape.

Soil Testing for Environmental Contaminates    

A guide to interpreting your heavy metals soil test result in New Hampshire.

 

Sour Mulch    

Question of the Week

Sprucing up Your Home with Holiday Greens    

Decorating our homes with greenery for the winter holidays is a ritual that dates back many centuries. Among the greens that are important this season we find evergreens, like balsam, spruce and fir, as well as holly, mistletoe, ivy, laurel and rosemary. All have great significance attached to them and most of it predates Christianity. For thousands of years, evergreens have represented signs of hope and life. Not only do they remain green when everything else in nature appears dead, some of the plants actually bear fruit.

Straw Bale Gardening    

question of the week

Understanding Your Soil Test Results    

The soil testing lab takes your soil sample and runs a small portion of the sample through a series of sophisticated test equipment. The results provide a chemical inventory of the soil – clues as to the quantity of nutrients or elements in the soil and their availability for plant growth.

Vegetable Garden Cleanup    

Cleaning up your vegetable garden will help to reduce next year's disease and insect problems. In fact, good sanitation is one of the most important steps you can take to insure that next year's garden will be healthy.

Plant disease agents such as bacteria, fungi and viruses all remain alive, though dormant, during the winter months. By recognizing the places where these organisms hide, gardeners can often destroy them and prevent disease outbreaks the following spring. Many fungi spend the winter on or in old leaves, fruit and other garden refuse. These fungi often form spores or other reproductive structures that remain alive even after the host plant has died. Cucumber and squash vines, cabbages, and the dried remains of tomato and bean plants are all likely to harbor fungi if left in the garden over the winter.

Insects, too, survive quite nicely over the winter months. Cucumber beetle, Colorado potato beetle and Mexican bean beetle all overwinter as adults. In spring they migrate to young plants where they feed and lay eggs for a new generation. Insects and plant pathogens survive on weeds as well as on garden plants. Many weeds serve as alternate hosts for insects and fungi, helping them to complete their life cycle. Destruction of these weeds removes a source of future troubles.

To avoid any or all of the above problems, infested plant debris should be carefully raked up and disposed of in the trash. Do not put refuse on your compost pile. It takes a fair amount of heat to kill these organisms, and you won't want to recycle them right back into the garden.

Wood Ashes    

I've heard that ashes from my woodstove are good for my lawn and garden. If so, how do I use them?

Zoysiagrass    

Advantages and Disadvantages


General Pest Control

Blueberry Stem Borer    

Blueberry stem borer is a beetle also known as the rhododendron stem borer and the azalea stem borer. It is in the family Cerambycidae [long-horned borers] and has a two to three year life cycle.

Mosquito Bites    

What safe methods do you suggest for protecting my family from mosquito bites?

Seasonal Invaders    

Q. Is there something I can spray to get rid of the brown bugs that keep coming indoors?

A. The bug you’re referring to is probably the western conifer seed bug. It’s one of five seasonal insects that commonly invade NH homes in the fall. The others are ladybugs, boxelder bugs, cluster flies, and the newest arrival, the brown marmorated stink bug. These invaders enter through cracks and crevices around doors and windows, ventilation louvers, air conditioner vents, and chimneys and fireplaces. The best way to keep them out is to do some serious caulking and sealing before they begin to congregate on sunny days in the fall. If you have an air conditioner, cover the opening or remove it from the window.

Western conifer seed bug feeds on the developing seeds and flowers of conifers, especially pines, white spruce and hemlock.  They are easily identified by their large size, about ¾ of an inch, and the flattened leaf-like expansion on their back legs. If you crush them, they will stink, although they’re not a stinkbug.

None of the winter invaders will harm you or the contents of your home.  They simply want to get out of the cold and will often spend the winter inside the walls of your house. Spraying a pesticide isn’t the best solution since this exposes everyone in the house to the toxins in the spray.  A vacuum cleaner is very effective, or you can sweep them up and put them back outside. Or, as Dr. Alan Eaton, UNH Cooperative Extension entomologist says, “learn to love them”.

Squash Vine Borer - Managing Problems    

Usually the insect bores through the vines, but occasionally they bore into the fruit of hard squash or pumpkin. Fruit damage generally occurs when there is a late flush of moths.


Home Lawns

How Much Fertilizer Do I Need For My Lawn?    

Proper Application and Amounts of Lawn Fertilizers

I have what looks like pink threads in my lawn. What it is and how can I get rid of it?    

I have what looks like pink threads in my lawn. What it is and how can I get rid of it?

Insect Pests of Home Lawns    

Insect Pests of Home Lawns

Lawn Diseases    
Turfgrass Nutrient Management Bulletin     

New England Regional Nitrogen and Phosphorus Fertilizer and Associated Management Practice Recommendations For Lawns Based on Water Quality Considerations


Home Water Supply

Drought Tolerant Plants for New Hampshire Landscapes    

Lists drought tolerant plants for New Hampshire.

Using Water Efficiently in the Landscape    

Guidelines for watering new and established trees and shrubs for homeowners and landscapers.


Houseplants

Aloe Vera    

Can I really use an aloe vera plant to treat burns?

Bromeliads    

The bromeliad family is large and varied. Its two best-known members, pineapples and Spanish moss, give an idea of the diversity of this group of plants. Most bromeliads are easy to grow indoors or in the greenhouse. They have attractive forms and leaf colors, many with flowers that
can last for months.

Culinary Chart    
Poinsettias: Care and Reflowering    

A brief history of poinsettias and instructions on the process of reflowering a plant year after year.

Where do poinsettias come from?    

Question of the Week


Indoor and Yard Pests/Human Health

Bed Bugs    

From fossil remains in ancient Egypt, we know that the common bed bug, Cimex lectularis, has troubled humans in their sleep for at least 3550 years. Both male and females feed exclusively on animal blood. Besides humans, bed bugs bite dogs, cats, birds, rodents, rabbits, and other pets.

Black Flies    
New Hampshire is home to approximately 40 species of black flies. Of these species, only 4 or 5 are considered to be significant human biters or annoying. In some cases, black flies may not bite but merely annoy as they swarm about the head or body. Only the females bite and fortunately most species feed on birds or other animals.
Blacklegged Ticks in New Hampshire, Updated Map 2015    

This map is the result of 26 years of  active and passive surveillance on blacklegged tick (BLT) in New Hampshire.In the beginning, there were just three published records of this species in New Hampshire.This map compiles over 900 records, through December 1, 2015. 

Controlling Wasps, Bees & Hornets Around Your Home    

Wasp encounters can be painful, even life-threatening, for a few highly sensitive people. Yet some New Hampshire species are not very aggressive and they also serve as valuable predators of soft-bodied insects.

Eastern Equine Encephalitis    

Updated in 2009, a comprehensive resource on Eastern Equine Encephalitis.

Fruit Flies    
Horsehair Worms    
Insect Repellents    

Insect repellents or "bite-preventing substances" for mosquitoes, gnats, no-see-ums and other insects.

Seasonal Insect Invaders in New Hampshire Homes    

Fact sheet on seasonal insect invaders in NH homes.

Spiders    
Springtails    
Ticks in New Hampshire - Biology and Management    

This publication will help you learn what ticks look like, how they
live, and how to protect yourself from tick-borne disease.

Winter Tick    

Winter tick is the only species of one-host tick in New Hampshire. Unlike other hard ticks, which feed on two or more hosts in their lives, it remains on a single host. Moose are the most common and severely impacted host for winter tick.


Insect Pests of Plants

Colorado Potato Beetle    

The Colorado Potato Beetle (CPB) became a pest when settlers brought potatoes into the Rocky Mountain area, the native home of this beetle. The beetle preferred the potato to its host weed and has spread to become a serious pest throughout the US and Eastern Canada.The CPB feeds on the leaves and terminal growth of nightshade-family plants, such as potato, tomato, and eggplant. The potato, however, is its preferred plant. The above-ground destruction of potato plants can cause severe reduction in tuber size and overall yield.

European Corn Borer    
The European corn borer (ECB, family Pyralidae, order Lepidoptera) arrived in North America during the early 1900s, probably in broom corn imported from Hungary and Italy for the manufacture of brooms.
Flea Beetles    
The name flea beetle describes many species of small beetles that chew tiny shot-holes in plant foliage and jump around like fleas when disturbed. Although some species feed on a wide range of plants, most FB species attack a single species or family of related plants.
Hemlock Woolly Adelgid    

Fact sheet about hemlock woolly adelgid, a forest pest affecting eastern hemlock trees.

Imported Cabbageworm    
The imported cabbageworm (ICW), the larval form of the delicate white butterflies that flutter around the summer garden, is a serious pest of cabbage-family crops.
Lily Leaf Beetle    
Description, life-cycle and control of the Lily Leaf Beetle on garden lilies
Question of the Week-Green Stink Bug    

My garden is being taken over by bright green bugs. What should I do?

Slugs    
Slugs are slimy, soft-bodied, grayish, orange or brownish mottled mollusks - snails without shells. Slugs vary in length up to 4 inches and leave a slimy silver-colored trail wherever they travel. They can become serious pests in and around the home, garden, and greenhouse.
Tarnished Plant Bug #1    

Tarnished Plant Bug, fact sheet 1

Tarnished Plant Bug in NH - Biological Control    

Tarnished plant bug (TPB) is a native insect that feeds on a huge range of plants. Native parasites held down its population somewhat, until alfalfa was introduced to the US about 100 years ago.

Three-Lined Potato Beetle    

Three-lined potato beetles are found on plants in the family Solanaceae, including potato, tomato and relatives.

Tortoise Beetle-Question of the Week    

An insect that looks like a tiny turtle encased in an oval of glass seems to be eating holes in my tomatoes. What is it?


Landscape Design

A New Hampshire Plant Palette    

Trees and shrubs that work well in New Hampshire landscaping.

Drought Tolerant Plants for New Hampshire Landscapes    

Lists drought tolerant plants for New Hampshire.

Integrated Landscaping: Following Nature's Lead    

Lavishly illustrated, Integrated Landscaping features original photos, drawings, and sketches on almost every page to provide clear examples of the concepts presented. The book also incorporates 12 plant-system models that help landscapers and gardeners apply the concepts of layering and visualize how plants can work together in a variety of different low- and high-stress settings.

Landscaping at the Water's Edge    

A manual for New Hampshire landowners and landscapers. Discusses stormwater management strategies and landscape practices that help protect clean lakes, streams, rivers and estuaries.

Landscaping at the Water's Edge: An Ecological Approach    

A manual for New Hampshire landowners and landscapers.

Pollinator Plants for Northern New England Gardens    

Create pollinator-friendly gardens to support numerous kinds of native bees, as well as honey bees and other pollinators. Planting a diverse mix of flowering plants that provides a sequence of blooms from early spring to late fall will have the most impact. Even a small patch of the right flowers can help, as it adds to the larger landscape mosaic in which the pollinators live and search for food.


Landscape Topics

Alternatives to Invasive Landscape Plants    

27 plant species are currently prohibited from sale, transport, distribution, propagation or transplantation in New Hampshire including burning bush, Japanese barberry and Norway maple (see entire list appended to this fact sheet). This publication suggests alternative landscape plants for New Hampshire.

Bee Nest Box Guidelines    

How to build wood bee nest boxes for native bees that make their homes in cavities.

Drought Tolerant Plants for New Hampshire Landscapes    

Lists drought tolerant plants for New Hampshire.

Efficient Water Use in Landscapes and Nurseries    

Intended for commercial landscapers, property managers and nursery audiences.

Landscape Trees and Their Susceptibility to Invasive Insects - brochure    

NH is facing a major threat to the health of our forest and landscape trees from exotic invasive insects. These invaders include the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), emerald ash borer (EAB), hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA), and elongate hemlock scale (EHS). This guide helps growers and consumers become aware of which trees are susceptible to future infestation by these devastating insects and guides them in the selection of non-sussceptible landscape and street trees.

Landscape Trees and their Susceptibility to Invasive Insects - poster    

NH is facing a major threat to the health of our forest and landscape trees from exotic invasive insects. These invaders include the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), emerald ash borer (EAB), hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA), and elongate hemlock scale (EHS). This guide helps growers and consumers become aware of which trees are susceptible to future infestation by these devastating insects and guides them in the selection of non-sussceptible landscape and street trees.

Landscaping at the Water's Edge    

A manual for New Hampshire landowners and landscapers. Discusses stormwater management strategies and landscape practices that help protect clean lakes, streams, rivers and estuaries.

Landscaping at the Water's Edge: An Ecological Approach    

A manual for New Hampshire landowners and landscapers.

Looking for Burning Bush?    

Burning Bush is prohibited from sale and planting in NH. Consider using these alternatives.

Looking for Japanese Barberry?    

Japanese Barberry is prohibited from sale or planting in NH. Consider using these alternatives.

Looking for Norway Maple?    

Norway Maple is prohibited from sale or planting in NH. Consider using these alternatives.

 

NH Horticulture Endowment Supports Meadow Establishment Research    

Feb-March 2011The Plantsman magazine article.

Planting and Mulching Trees and Shrubs    

Information on selecting and planting trees and shrubs, staking and mulching, watering  and providing care during establishment.

Planting for Pollinators     

Provides recommendations on selecting species, site preparation, planting, and management of wildflower meadows for pollinator habitat. Poster format.

Pollinator Plants for Northern New England Gardens    

Create pollinator-friendly gardens to support numerous kinds of native bees, as well as honey bees and other pollinators. Planting a diverse mix of flowering plants that provides a sequence of blooms from early spring to late fall will have the most impact. Even a small patch of the right flowers can help, as it adds to the larger landscape mosaic in which the pollinators live and search for food.

Pruning Evergreens in the Landscape    

Information on when to prune, what tools to use, and pruning techniques.

Selected Wildflowers for NE Meadows    

A list of the wildflower species that have performed well in our meadows at UNH.  We have found these species to be the key players in our young meadows. They germinate reliably, grow quickly, and perform well in the competitive meadow environment. Use this list as a starting point for designing a mix of your own.

Slow-Release Fertilizers for Home Gardens and Landscapes    

Information on comparing and choosing  slow-release fertilizers for your garden or landscape.

Summary of Ten Natural Principles to Guide your Landscape Practices    

Summary of Ten Natural Principles to Guide your Landscape Practices

(excerpted from Integrated Landscaping: Following Nature’s Lead by Lauren Chase Rowell, Katherine Hartnett, Mary Tebo and Marilyn Wyzga, UNH Cooperative Extension, 2007)

Turf Soil Testing    

Explains the why and how of soil testing.

Using Water Efficiently in the Landscape    

Guidelines for watering new and established trees and shrubs for homeowners and landscapers.

Wildflowers for New England Meadows and Pollinator Plantings    

A list of native and naturalized perennials and grasses used in New England wildflower mixes for designing sustainable meadows and pollinator gardens. Includes plant characteristics and bloom times. Revised July 2015.


Nuisance Wildlife

Nuisance Wildlife in and Around the Home    

This fact sheet contains some basic guidelines for dealing with wild animals in and around the home. The suggestions come from Cooperative Extension specialists and wildlife biologists at Wildlife Services, a federally and cooperatively-funded branch of the US Department of Agriculture that specializes in reducing human-wildlife conflicts.

Pesky Winter Critters    

Pesky Winter Critters Fact Sheet

Voles in New Hampshire Orchards and Highbush Blueberries    

Two species of small rodents regularly damage orchard trees and blueberries in New Hampshire.


Plant Diseases

Lawn Diseases    
Tomato Problems    

You can reduce or eliminate many problems by improving the plant growing environment and your gardening skills. The following list of physiological disorders represent some of the more common tomato problems.


Small Fruit

Blueberry Fruit Fly - Using Traps to Monitor    

Blueberry fruit fly, Rhagoletis mendax Curran is a native insect that looks almost identical to apple maggot, except that it attacks blueberries, not apples.

Blueberry Stem Borer    

Blueberry stem borer is a beetle also known as the rhododendron stem borer and the azalea stem borer. It is in the family Cerambycidae [long-horned borers] and has a two to three year life cycle.

Blueberry Varieties for NH Growers    

Recommended blueberry varieties for New Hampshire.

Gooseberries and Currants    

I'd like to grow gooseberries and currants to make jam. Are these plants well-suited for growth in New Hampshire?

Growing Fruit: Lowbush Blueberries    

Wild (lowbush) blueberries have always called New Hampshire home. These small, flavor andantioxidant packed fruits are common in abandoned fields, in succession forests, on mountaintops, andalong roadsides.

Growing Fruits: Raspberries and other bramble crops    

Guide to growing raspberries and other bramble crops.

Growing Fruits: Strawberries    

Strawberries are an excellent crop for New Hampshire home
gardeners. With proper care strawberry beds will produce good crops for three to five years, beginning one year after planting. An initial planting of 100 plants should provide enough fruit for a family of four, with surplus for freezing or making preserves.

Growing Grapes    
Pollinating Fruit Crops    

Most tree fruits and many small fruits grown in New Hampshire require cross pollination to produce a crop. Fruit crops that are self-fruitful will often produce larger crops where cross pollination occurs. Plan for adequate cross pollination of fruit crops before you buy trees or plants.

Raspberry and Blackberry Varieties for New Hampshire    

Recommended raspberry & blackberry varieties for New Hampshire.

Small Fruit Cultivars for Home Gardens in Coös County    
List of recommended small fruit cultivation in coos country.
Small Fruit Cultivars for New Hampshire Gardens    
A guide to strawberries, blueberries, brambles and grape varieties for NH. Includes a list of nurseries in NH.
The NH Fruit and Vegetable Harvest Season    
A chart that shows the availability of locally grown fruits and vegetables based on harvest dates.

Tree Fruit

Apple Tree Borers in New Hampshire     

Several species of insects bore into NH apple trees, including round-headed apple tree borer, flat-headed apple tree borer, dogwood borer, leopard moth and the broad-necked root borer.

Choke Cherry - Source of X Disease    

Choke cherry identification is important for peach and sweet cherry growers. This is because choke cherry (Prunus virginiana L.) is important in spreading a fatal disease of peach and sweet cherry trees, called X-disease.

Dwarf Rootstocks for Apple Trees in the Home Garden    

What rootstock should the home gardener choose? Here are a few notes on some of the common rootstocks available.

Growing Peaches and Nectarines in the Home Garden    

Information about growing peaches and nectarines in New Hampshire.

Growing Pears in the Home Garden    

Pears will grow well throughout the southern half of New Hampshire. They are reasonably winter hardy where temperatures seldom fall below -25oF.

Pollinating Fruit Crops    

Most tree fruits and many small fruits grown in New Hampshire require cross pollination to produce a crop. Fruit crops that are self-fruitful will often produce larger crops where cross pollination occurs. Plan for adequate cross pollination of fruit crops before you buy trees or plants.

The NH Fruit and Vegetable Harvest Season    
A chart that shows the availability of locally grown fruits and vegetables based on harvest dates.
Training and Pruning Young Apple and Pear Trees    

Proper training and pruning is essential for development of structurally strong, productive apple and pear trees that will bear high quality fruits annually for many years.

Tree Fruit Varieties for the Great North Woods    

Growing fruit in Coös County and other colder sites in New Hampshire can be challenging for the home grower.


Trees and Shrubs

A New Hampshire Plant Palette    

Trees and shrubs that work well in New Hampshire landscaping.

Alternatives to Invasive Landscape Plants    

27 plant species are currently prohibited from sale, transport, distribution, propagation or transplantation in New Hampshire including burning bush, Japanese barberry and Norway maple (see entire list appended to this fact sheet). This publication suggests alternative landscape plants for New Hampshire.

Disease-Resistant Crabapples    

Crabapples are a mainstay of our landscape palette in New England. Their beautiful bloom, small stature, and attractive fruit give them year-round interest…unless they are devastated by disease! Crabapples are susceptible to four major diseases which can cause early defoliation, disfigurement and weakening of trees.

Drought Tolerant Plants for New Hampshire Landscapes    

Lists drought tolerant plants for New Hampshire.

Efficient Water Use in Landscapes and Nurseries    

Intended for commercial landscapers, property managers and nursery audiences.

Fertilizing Trees and Shrubs    

Describes when to fertilize; how to manage soil pH; what fertilizers to use; how much to use; and how to apply fertilizers.

Getting to the Roots: Production Effects on Tree Root Growth and Morphology    

Recent nursery production research conducted in the Northeast has far reaching implications for the way trees and shrubs are grown, including plant health and quality, environmental impact and return on investment.

Landscape Trees and Their Susceptibility to Invasive Insects - brochure    

NH is facing a major threat to the health of our forest and landscape trees from exotic invasive insects. These invaders include the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB), emerald ash borer (EAB), hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA), and elongate hemlock scale (EHS). This guide helps growers and consumers become aware of which trees are susceptible to future infestation by these devastating insects and guides them in the selection of non-sussceptible landscape and street trees.

Landscaping at the Water's Edge: An Ecological Approach    

A manual for New Hampshire landowners and landscapers.

Looking for Burning Bush?    

Burning Bush is prohibited from sale and planting in NH. Consider using these alternatives.

Looking for Japanese Barberry?    

Japanese Barberry is prohibited from sale or planting in NH. Consider using these alternatives.

Looking for Norway Maple?    

Norway Maple is prohibited from sale or planting in NH. Consider using these alternatives.

 

Northern Catalpa, Catalpa speciosa    

This curious tree with its almost tropical show of speckled white flowers, looks out of place in  New England;  too showy for out Puritan tastes.  The elegant trumpet shaped flowers are clustered on panicles (stems) in tiers with three smaller stems. The first two tiers produce three flowers at the end of these smaller stems to add up to nine individual flowers per tier or 18 flowers on the two tiers.  The lower tiers have but one flower at the end of the smaller stem or six additional flowers.  There were 24 individual flowers on the cluster that I counted.  Somehow the seeds produced by the flowers end up inside long skinny 6” -12 “ beans that dangle from the tree later in the summer; hanging on through the winter.

Planting and Mulching Trees and Shrubs    

Information on selecting and planting trees and shrubs, staking and mulching, watering  and providing care during establishment.

Pruning Evergreens in the Landscape    

Information on when to prune, what tools to use, and pruning techniques.

Using Water Efficiently in the Landscape    

Guidelines for watering new and established trees and shrubs for homeowners and landscapers.

What to Look for When Buying Landscape Plants    

Investing in quality plants is the first step in assuring long-term satisfaction when choosing trees or shrubs.


Vegetables and Herbs

Growing Beans    
Growing Vegetables: Asparagus    

Asparagus is a perennial crop that produces spears year after year for 10 to 15 years or longer if the plants are given adequate care. 

Growing Vegetables: Garlic    

Garlic is one of the easiest and most satisfying crops for home
vegetable gardeners to grow. It yields two useful crops; the garlic bulbs themselves, and delicious green “scapes” a month earlier. Because it is usually planted in the fall and begins to grow early in the spring, garlic provides the garden with something green and encouraging, long before other crops have germinated.

Growing Vegetables: Sweet Corn    

Sweet corn is a popular vegetable and is relatively easy to grow. Among market gardeners throughout New England, about half of the vegetable acreage is devoted to sweet corn.

Growing Vegetables: Sweetpotatoes in NH    

Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) is a member of the morning glory (Convolvulaceae) family. The sweetpotato is not related to the Irish potato, which belongs to the nightshade (Solanaceae) family. Unlike potatoes, which are tubers, sweetpotatoes are roots.

Growing Vegetables: Tomatoes    

Tomatoes are far and away the most popular vegetable crop among the nation’s home gardeners, and with good reason: not only are tomatoes tasty, nutritious and versatile, they are relatively easy to grow and return high value for the space they occupy.

Jerusalem artichokes     

My neighbor gave me some Jerusalem Artichokes. What do I do with them?

Preserving your Harvest-Question of the Week    

We’ve planted a much bigger vegetable garden this year and will
need some advice on the safest, most efficient ways to preserve
some of our harvest

The NH Fruit and Vegetable Harvest Season    
A chart that shows the availability of locally grown fruits and vegetables based on harvest dates.
Tomato Problems    

You can reduce or eliminate many problems by improving the plant growing environment and your gardening skills. The following list of physiological disorders represent some of the more common tomato problems.


Weeds

Crabgrass    

Wood Heat

Heating with Wood and Coal    

This book is intended to provide basic information on using wood or coal for home heating. Choosing a fuel, fireplaces, stoves, and furnaces are discussed. Stove installation basics and safety are reviewed. Intended for homeowners and educators. Revised 2003.


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