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A Low-Tech Water Garden

Picture yourself sitting in the shade on a hot summer day, lazily sipping iced tea,
listening to the gentle trickle of water into a lovely pond of water lilies—in your very own
garden. Impossible, you say. Just think of all those pumps, filters, liners, running
electricity to the pond, digging the pond, maintaining the pond! Not so, I say. With the
basic equipment of a pool liner and an outside water faucet you can have exactly what I
have described at modest expense.

African Violets

African Violets can bloom all year long. They make great houseplants, with their cheerful flowers brightening up a windowsill even in the dead of winter. Since their discovery over one hundred years ago, they have become very popular.

African Violets Can Bloom All Year Long

African Violets can bloom all year long. They make great houseplants, with their cheerful flowers brightening up a windowsill even in the dead of winter.

Creating Dish Gardens

A dish garden is a miniature landscape in an open, shallow container.

Cut Flowers

A guide to purchasing, caring for and growing cut flowers.

Fall is a Great Time to Lime

Lime is applied directly to the soil of your lawn to increase the soil pH. Soil pH, a
measure of the soil’s acidity or alkalinity, can directly influence the vigor and quality of
your home lawn.

Fall Vegetables

If you want to get more from your garden this year you should consider a late summer planting. Naturally you won’t be able to start such long-season crops as tomatoes, peppers, squash, cabbage or melons. However, early August is an ideal time to start cool-weather crops like peas, greens (lettuce, spinach, kale, chard, mesclun, mizuna, mustards, etc.) and root crops (carrots, radishes and beets). These will thrive under the growing conditions of early fall and the hardiest of them can be harvested until the ground freezes. Squeezing in a last planting of beans is a little risky because there may not be time for them to mature before the first frost, but what’s life without a little risk?

FALL-BLOOMING PERENNIALS

By autumn, many of the spring- and summer-blooming perennials have faded, leaving the garden bleak and colorless.  But some perennials, such as asters and goldenrod, will provide vivid color until the first killing frost or even later.

Flowers and Materials used for Winter Bouquets

Flowers and Materials used for Winter Bouquets

Gifts from the Garden

The gift-giving season is with us and who could be easier to choose or make a gift for
than a gardener? It’s so easy, because most of us who garden like almost everything.
Small or large, useful or frivolous, there are many items that are easy to make and
guaranteed to bring pleasure. Most of these also make a great hostess gift for a holiday
party.

Hurry Spring Along: Bring the Outdoors In

forcing spring-flowering bulbs

HYDROPONIC VEGETABLE GARDENING

You can experience the ease and success of growing hydroponic vegetables indoors and
outdoors.

It's Always a Great Time to Lime

Lime is applies directly to the soil of your lawn to increase the soil pH.

Making Christmas Ornaments

Making Christmas Ornaments

October’s the Time to Dig and Store Summer Bulbs

The difference between hardy and tender bulbous plants is a matter of geography, not underground structure. Plants originally developed bulbs, corms, and tubers to help them survive conditions like cold and drought. In cold-climate gardens many tender bulbous plants which can’t survive extremely low soil temperatures can be lifted and brought indoors for their winter’s rest. Some of the varieties commonly lifted and stored indoors inNew Englandare tuberous begonias, dahlias, cannas, caladium, elephant’s ears and gladiolus. 

Pesky Winter Critters

Pesky Winter Critters Fact Sheet

Plan Now for Indoor Spring Flowers

Forcing spring bulbs is easy to do and far less expensive than buying pots of
flowers from retail establishments that do the growing for you.



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