Good Forestry in the Granite State:
Recommended Voluntary Forest Management Practices for New Hampshire
Table of Contents >>1.4 Estate Planning and Land Protection << 1.5 Staying Safe Working in the Woods >> Silviculture: Additional Reading

1.5 STAYING SAFE WORKING IN THE WOODS

BACKGROUND

If good safety practices aren't followed, working in the woods alone with chainsaws and other equipment can result in swift and serious injuries or death. Expensive equipment can be damaged or destroyed if operated in an unsafe manner.

Loggers and others whose occupation is associated with tree cutting take courses on safety and are generally expected to conform to certain safety practices. Private landowners don't have similar requirements but are encouraged to attend chainsaw and other safety classes or orientations and hands-on training. A few basic practices can make the difference between a productive and exhilarating (even if tiring) session in the woods and possible serious personal injury, damage to equipment, or damage to residual trees.

 

OBJECTIVE

Avoid personal injury, damage to equipment, and damage to residual trees by practicing good safety as a matter of routine.

CONSIDERATIONS

RECOMMENDED PRACTICES

CROSS REFERENCES

1.1 First Steps in Forest Management; 3.1 Timber Harvesting Systems.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

RSA 508:14. Limitation of Actions. http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/lii/508/508-14.htm Accessed May 27, 2010.

UNH Cooperative Extension. 2001. Safe Timber Harvesting. http://extension.unh.edu/resources/files/Resource001062_Rep1293.pdf Accessed on January 26, 2010.

1.4 Estate Planning and Land Protection << 1.5 Staying Safe Working in the Woods >> Silviculture: Additional Reading

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