How to grow garlic chives (Allium tuberosum)

garlic chives Allium tuberosum

Germination

7-14 days

Planting

Plant seeds in moist soil with good drainage, in full sun to part shade. Sow as soon as the seeds are ripe in the fall, or in a cold frame in the spring. Sow lightly, and thin to 12 inches apart on all sides when seedlings are 2” tall. Bulb clumps can be divided and planted in early spring. Hardy to USDA Zone 3. Self-seeds aggressively. Flowers may be dead-headed before seeds are set to control spreading.

Harvesting

Young leaves can be harvested anytime. The edible flowers can be picked shortly after opening.

Description

Garlic chives are a perennial, clump-forming herb. They are in the onion family and have a strong onion or garlic scent. The edible leaves grow up to 12” long, and the fragrant edible white flowers rise just above the foliage.

Profile

Planting Depth: 1/4 inch
Soil Temperature: 50℉
Germination: 7-14 days
Plant Spacing: 12 inches
Row Spacing: 12 inches
Maturity: 80-90 days
Soil: Evenly moist, well-drained
Growing Habit: Upright perennial
Sun: Full sun to part shade
Plant Size: 18-24 inches tall; 12 inches wide

History

Moon and Stars watermelon is one of the most popular heirloom varieties in the United States. Commercial rights were sold to Peter Henderson & Company of New York in the 1920s. The creator of the plant is unknown, but it was originally called “Sun, Moon, and Stars.” By the 1970s it had almost completely disappeared from American Gardens, until it was “rediscovered” and included in the 1981 Fall Harvest Edition of Seed Saver’s Exchange.

Connection to Extension

Garlic Chives are one of the seeds offered by Strawbery Banke Museum through our free seed for education program. 


 

This planting guide was created through partnership among Strawbery Banke Museum, New Hampshire School & Youth Garden Network, New Hampshire Master Gardener Alumni Association and UNH Extension Master Gardeners.

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