Vegetable IPM Reports

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Agriculture & Gardens > Fruit & Vegetable Crops

Weekly pest scouting reports from across New Hampshire by integrated pest management team. 

Quick Links to 2023 Reports

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10/6/2023

Hello Vegetable IPM Enthusiasts! 

Our trapping season is coming to an end, and this will be the last vegetable IPM report for the year. All traps (except BMSB) will be pulled from field locations next week. Crop loss has been heavy this season and I hope growers will make it through alright. UNH cooperative extension will be launching an online survey on Friday October 13th to evaluate vegetable crop losses due to excessive moisture and frost events. One objective of the survey is to provide data to entities who may be poised to provide grant funding to impacted producers. So please keep an eye on your inbox and feel free to reach out to me if you need help completing the survey. 

Most insect pressure has slowed except for the brown marmorated stink bug.

Sweet corn pests weekly summary October 6

Moth report

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) numbers are very low within production areas. Control locations are still showing high numbers, suggesting that late raspberries and day neutral strawberries could be a risk 

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) catch increased significantly this week but only one location was over the generally accepted threshold of 10 adults. BMSB are most susceptible to insecticides in the nymphal stages. For more great information on BMSB, go to https://www.stopbmsb.org/managing-bmsb/.   

SWD weekly summary

Below are a few graphics the summarize the insect pressure this season:

European Corn Borers graph
Corn Earworms graph
Squash Vine Borer graph
Western Bean Cutworm graph

Thank you all for sticking with the program this year and for reading along! I hope you found the information helpful and as always, reach out to UNH extension with any questions you may have! 

Upcoming Events: 

OCTOBER 16, 2023 | 1:00 - 2:30PM 

OCTOBER 18, 2023 | 3:00 - 6:00PM 

OCTOBER 20, 2023 | 3:00 - 6:00PM 

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food integrated pest management program. This work is also supported in part by the Integrated Pest Management Crop Protection and Pest Management EIP grant no. 2021-70006-35477 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

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9/29/2023

Total ECB Combined Catch graph

Hello Vegetable IPM Enthusiasts! 

Winter Rye is popping and still being spread around the state as fields come out of production. The latest sweet corn blocks are in silk now. Our trapping season is winding down as insect pressure slows. Next Friday will likely be the final IPM report for the season. We no longer have data to share for European corn borer, but as a reminder, tilling or mowing your corn residue can help to reduce overwintering populations. The Chart above shows the combined European corn borer catch count, week by week, for the 2023 growing season. We can clearly see the peaks of 1st and 2nd flight nicely. 

On a separate note, UNH cooperative extension will be launching an online survey to evaluate crop losses due to excessive moisture and frost events. This will be rolled out in the coming weeks so please keep an eye on your inbox for it!  

Overall Corn Earworm (CEW) catch dropped off significantly this week, but some locations are still seeing high enough pressure to warrant a 4-day spray schedule for fresh silking corn. Corn development is really slowing down with the cool nights, and late blocks are taking longer to ripen. The race till first hard frost is on! 

Total Fall Armyworm (FAW) catch dropped by more than 50 percent this week. With that said the highest catch for a single trap was only 5 moths. A handful of FAW traps were decommissioned this week. FAW larval feeding damage is characterized by large, ragged holes in leaves, and sawdust-like excrement. Field scouting should begin once moths are captured at your farm or in your area. Click the link to more information on how to field scout. 

Sweet corn pests weekly summary, 9/29/2023 

 

Sweet corn pests catch for September 29 by town
Moths spray interval table

 

Overall Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) numbers have dropped this week but remained high in control locations. Only one in-field trap was high with a catch of 12. Monitoring is now only happening within raspberry and grape plantings on three farms. Traps are starting to come down as production slows. go to https://ag.umass.edu/fruit/resources/spotted-wing-drosophila-management for more management information. Trapping data is recorded in the table below. 

All Squash vine borer (SVB) traps were decommissioned this week. This will be the last week of report SVB data. Zero Squash borer were caught across the network for the second week in a row. SVB pupae overwinter within the soil at a depth of 1-2 inches. Fall and spring tillage can help to bury pupae deeper than 2 inches, which will reduce their overwintering success. 

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) catch has dropped this week. no notable hotspots this week. BMSB are most susceptible to insecticides in the nymphal stages. For more great information on BMSB, go to https://www.stopbmsb.org/managing-bmsb/.   

SVB/SWD/BMSB weekly Summary, 9/29/2023 

SVB Weekly Summary September 29 by town

 

Check back in each week as the season progresses to see the latest trapping data. Data for additional insect pests will be updated on a weekly basis. 

Thank you to all the growers who participate in the program!  

Upcoming Events: 

OCTOBER 5, 2023 | 4:00 - 6:00PM 

 

OCTOBER 16, 2023 | 1:00 - 2:30PM 

 

OCTOBER 18, 2023 | 3:00 - 6:00PM 

 

OCTOBER 20, 2023 | 3:00 - 6:00PM 

 

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food integrated pest management program. This work is also supported in part by the Integrated Pest Management Crop Protection and Pest Management EIP grant no. 2021-70006-35477 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. 

 

 

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9/22/2023

Spread of conidia cycle
Northern corn leaf blight life cycle, Illustration by Leroy Svec, Pioneer Research Scientist (retired) 

 

Hello Vegetable IPM Enthusiasts! 

Our full time IPM scout, Linda, caught Zero European corn borer (ECB) moths for the second week in a row. At this point, all ECB traps have been pulled and risk of damage is over. As a reminder, ECB overwinters in crop reside. To limit the overwintering success of ECB, thoroughly incorporate crop residues via tillage, followed by an appropriate cover crop. Growers utilizing no till can rotary or flail mow corn residue to destroy overwintering habitat. flail mowing is the preferred method. Not only will destroying crop residue limit overwintering success of ECB, but it can also reduce fungal disease pressure for next season. Northern corn leaf blight is a fungal pathogen of sweet corn that was observed on a couple of farms in Hillsborough County. This disease is primarily driven by cool, wet weather which we had plenty of that this summer and fall.  follow this link to learn more on how to manage northern corn leaf blight. 

Most of our call-in growers have removed traps and will no longer be reporting trapping data for this season. 

Overall Corn Earworm (CEW) catch was down this week, but many locations are still seeing high pressure. Most locations are still on a 4-day spray schedule for fresh silking corn. Corn development is really slowing down with the cool nights, and late blocks are taking longer to ripen. 

Total Fall Armyworm (FAW) catch count is the highest it has been all season, but that was due to some hot spots in the Hollis and Milford area. With that said the highest catch for a single trap was 9 moths. FAW larval feeding damage is characterized by large, ragged holes in leaves, and sawdust-like excrement. Field scouting should begin once moths are captured at your farm or in your area. Click the link to more information on how to field scout. 

The current late blight map has reported no new outbreaks. To track late blight on your own go to https://usablight.org/map/. If you suspect late blight in your fields, please reach out to your county specialist. 

Sweet corn pests weekly summary, 9/22/2023 

Sweet corn pests summary for September 22 by town
Moths spray interval

 

 

Within control locations, Overall Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) numbers have remained high but in-field numbers are low. All Traps within production areas reported 3 or less flies per trap. Monitoring is now only happening within raspberry and grape plantings on three farms. Traps are starting to come down as production slows. go to https://ag.umass.edu/fruit/resources/spotted-wing-drosophila-management for more management information. Trapping data is recorded in the table below, alongside the data for squash vine borer. 

Squash vine borer (SVB) numbers are virtually non-existent. All susceptible plants are robust enough at this point in the season to escape further damage. Next week SVB traps will be pulled from fields, marking the end of motoring for this insect for the season. SVB pupae overwinter within the soil at a depth of 1-2 inches. Fall and spring tillage can help to bury pupae deeper than 2 inches, which will reduce their overwintering success. 

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) catch has remained steady this week. Hollis is the hot spot again this week. BMSB are most susceptible to insecticides in the nymphal stages. For more great information on BMSB, go to https://www.stopbmsb.org/managing-bmsb/.   

SVB/SWD/BMSB weekly Summary, 9/22/2023 

SVB Weekly Summary September 22 by town

 Check back in each week as the season progresses to see the latest trapping data. Data for additional insect pests will be updated on a weekly basis. 

Thank you to all the growers who participate in the program!  

Upcoming Events: 

OCTOBER 5, 2023 | 4:00 - 6:00PM 

 

OCTOBER 16, 2023 | 1:00 - 2:30PM 

 

OCTOBER 18, 2023 | 3:00 - 6:00PM 

 

OCTOBER 20, 2023 | 3:00 - 6:00PM 

 

 

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food integrated pest management program. This work is also supported in part by the Integrated Pest Management Crop Protection and Pest Management EIP grant no. 2021-70006-35477 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. 

 

 

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9/15/2023

Temperature and rainfall charts for Manchester
(Source: Weather.gov, NOAA Data) 

 

Hello Vegetable IPM Enthusiasts! 

We are back with heavy rains this week and hurricane Lee is projected to hit the seacoast in the next 24 hours. Temperatures are now in a “normal range” for September. For precipitation we are about 15 inches more than a typical year, depending on exact location. This is based on NOAA data, see chart above. 

We are well past the halfway point of harvest for sweet corn and fall cucurbits are slowly coming in. Choosing when and how to harvest fall cucurbits, like pumpkins, is a challenge this year. Fruit rot diseases have been a major issue this season and picking and properly storing your fruits as soon as they are mature is recommended. For some more detailed information on harvesting and storing pumpkins and winter squash, follow this link: https://ag.umass.edu/vegetable/fact-sheets/pumpkin-winter-squash-harvest-storage 

As a reminder, the USDA has provided more flexibility regarding disaster programs for flood-impacted producers in the northeast. the Farm service agency has authorized policy exceptions in all flood-impacted counties in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont. For the full press release and more information go to https://www.fsa.usda.gov/news-room/news-releases/2023/usda-offers-disaster-program-flexibilities-for-flood-impacted-producers-in-the-northeast 

The current late blight map has reported no new outbreaks. To track late blight on your own go to https://usablight.org/map/. If you suspect late blight in your fields, please reach out to your county specialist. 

Only one European corn borer (ECB) moth was captured by a self-monitoring grower this week. If no catch is found next week, our traps will be pulled for the season. Most sweet corn is past whorl and pretassel at this point, signifying low risk of damage from ECB. Click the link to learn more about scouting and trapping. The results of our trapping efforts are recorded by town on the table below with ECB-NY and ECB-IA moth counts shown. In some cases, there are multiple traps within a town.  

Total Corn Earworm (CEW) pressure increased significantly to the highest levels we’ve seen this season. One site in Milford reported a catch of 110 moths in a single trap! The growers in high infestation areas are now on a 3-day schedule, but most in the network are still on a 4-day spray schedule. CEW resistance to pyrethroid products (i.e. Warrior) is well documented in other regions and if you notice a lack of control, consider rotating pyrethroids (Group 3A) with products from a different chemical class. This is especially important for growers who rely solely on pyrethroids for CEW control. Blackhawk/Radiant (group 5) and Besiege/Coragen (groups 28, 3A) could make good rotation partners/alternative choices. If pyrethroids are to be used for control, the current recommendation is to use those products earlier in the growing season because resistance can build throughout the year. Also, control can vary from product to product within the pyrethroid class. The most resistance build up is seen with Warrior. If a pyrethroid is to be used, consider selecting a different Pyrethroid product, like Hero or Baythriod XL.  

Fall Armyworm (FAW) catch has remained steady. Some trapping sites have shown higher numbers, some have shown lower numbers. FAW larval feeding damage is characterized by large, ragged holes in leaves, and sawdust-like excrement. Field scouting should begin once moths are captured at your farm or in your area. Click the link to more information on how to field scout. 

For the second week in a row, zero Western bean cutworm (WBC) moths were caught. We have pulled our WBC traps for this season, effectively marking the end of WBC damage potential.  

Sweet corn pests weekly summary, 9/15/2023 

Sweet Corn Pests weekly summary by town

 

Moths spray interval table

 

Within control locations, Overall Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) numbers have remained high but in-field numbers are low. Monitoring is now only happening within raspberry and grape plantings on three farms. Traps are starting to come down as production slows. go to https://ag.umass.edu/fruit/resources/spotted-wing-drosophila-management for more management information. Trapping data is recorded in the table below, alongside the data for squash vine borer. 

Squash vine borer (SVB) numbers are low, but we did see a slight bump in overall numbers, from 1 last week to 8 this week. Most susceptible plants are robust enough at this point in the season to escape further damage. 

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) adult catches have more than doubled this week. One location in Hollis Reported a catch of 11. Another location in Litchfield reported a catch of 8 adults. In addition, 5 nymphs were found in Antrim and 12 nymphs at a location in Litchfield. BMSB are most susceptible to insecticides in the nymphal stages. For more great information on BMSB, go to https://www.stopbmsb.org/managing-bmsb/.   

SVB/SWD/BMSB weekly Summary, 9/15/2023 

SVB Weekly Summary for September 15 by town

 

Check back in each week as the season progresses to see the latest trapping data. Data for additional insect pests will be updated on a weekly basis. 

Thank you to all the growers who participate in the program!  

Upcoming Events: 

SEPTEMBER 20, 2023 | 8:00AM - 3:00PM 

OCTOBER 5, 2023 | 4:00 - 6:00PM 

 

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food integrated pest management program. This work is also supported in part by the Integrated Pest Management Crop Protection and Pest Management EIP grant no. 2021-70006-35477 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. 

 

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9/08/2023

Pumpkins in a row on grass leading to a tractor full of pumpkins
Photo by David O’Hearn 

Hello Vegetable IPM Enthusiasts! 

The extreme temperatures this week have actually forced some growers with lighter soils to irrigate! This is a year of feast or famine for sure. In southern NH we are approaching the midpoint of the season for sweet corn and pumpkins and squash are starting to come in for growers who were able to dodge disease pressure. Harvest is down across the board for fall cucurbits. 

As a reminder, the USDA has provided more flexibility regarding disaster programs for flood-impacted producers in the northeast. the Farm service agency has authorized policy exceptions in all flood-impacted counties in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Vermont. For the full press release and more information go to https://www.fsa.usda.gov/news-room/news-releases/2023/usda-offers-disaster-program-flexibilities-for-flood-impacted-producers-in-the-northeast 

The current late blight map has reported outbreaks north of Montreal. to track late blight on your own go to https://usablight.org/map/  

Only  Handful of European corn borer (ECB) were caught across the network this week. flight is virtually over for the year, and ECB numbers will most likely stay low for the remainder of the season. In the southern part of the state, there is some whorl stage corn left but most has progressed past whorl. With whorl stage corn, larval feeding damage is characterized by tiny “shot holes” in the leaves. Eventually the larvae will bore into the developing tassel and stalks. The later season scouting procedure is the same but consider that you may be encountering FAW damage as well. Click the link to learn more about scouting and trapping. The results of our trapping efforts are recorded by town on the table below with ECB-NY and ECB-IA moth counts shown. In some cases, there are multiple traps within a town.  

Total Corn Earworm (CEW) catch was lower this week over last but still in the high range. some farms went up and some farms saw a reduction is pressure. At this point in the season, most locations are still on a 4-day spray schedule. CEW resistance to pyrethroid products (i.e. Warrior) is well documented in other regions and if you notice a lack of control, consider rotating pyrethroids (Group 3A) with products from a different chemical class. This is especially important for growers who rely solely on pyrethroids for CEW control. Blackhawk/Radiant (group 5) and Besiege/Coragen (groups 28, 3A) could make good rotation partners/alternative choices. If pyrethroids are to be used for control, the current recommendation is to use those products earlier in the growing season because resistance can build throughout the year. Also, control can vary from product to product within the pyrethroid class. The most resistance build up is seen with Warrior. If a pyrethroid is to be used, consider selecting a different Pyrethroid product, like Hero or Baythriod XL.  

Fall Armyworm (FAW) catch was the same as last week. Damage is being reported in the latest whorl sage corn blocks. FAW damage is being reported in other New York states despite little or no moth catch. FAW larval feeding damage is characterized by large, ragged holes in leaves, and sawdust-like excrement. Large populations may kill or stunt young corn plants. Field scouting should begin once moths are captured at your farm or in your area. Click the link to more information on how to field scout. 

Zero Western bean cutworm (WBC) moths were caught this week, but larval stages could still be active in the field. Scout fields by examining the upper surfaces of the leaves at the top of the plant and leaves above and below the ear zone. Eggs are laid in masses and change from a cream color to lavender to dark purple as they age. Use the sun to your advantage and look for the egg mass shadows while scouting. Materials used for corn earworm control will also control western bean cutwormConsult the New England vegetable management guide for recommendations. 

Sweet corn pests weekly summary, 9/8/2023 

Sweet corn pests summary by town for 9/8/2023

 

Moth spray summary

 

Overall Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) numbers have remained as compared to last week. Very high traps counts mostly occurred with control traps in hedgerows or other non-treated areas. in field counts were much lower, suggesting that control methods are working. Traps are starting to come down as production slows. go to https://ag.umass.edu/fruit/resources/spotted-wing-drosophila-management for more management information. Trapping data is recorded in the table below, alongside the data for squash vine borer. 

A Single Squash vine borer (SVB) moth was caught this week in the southern/central New Hampshire area. Most susceptible plants are robust enough at this point in the season to escape further damage. 

Nine Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) adult were caught this week in sites that reported. Ten Nymphs were also caught at one location in Litchfield. We currently do not have any thresholds established for BMSB but we continue to keep an eye on population levels in the state. For more great information on BMSB, go to https://www.stopbmsb.org/managing-bmsb/.   

SVB/SWD/BMSB weekly Summary, 9/8/2023 

SVB Weekly summary by town for 9/8/2023

 

Check back in each week as the season progresses to see the latest trapping data. Data for additional insect pests will be updated on a weekly basis. 

Thank you to all the growers who participate in the program!  

 

Upcoming Events: 

SEPTEMBER 20, 2023 | 8:00AM - 3:00PM 

 

OCTOBER 5, 2023 | 4:00 - 6:00PM 

 

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food integrated pest management program. This work is also supported in part by the Integrated Pest Management Crop Protection and Pest Management EIP grant no. 2021-70006-35477 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. 

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9/01/2023

FAW Damage in corn plant
FAW damage in corn. Photo by University of Georgia, bugwood.org

Hello Vegetable IPM Enthusiasts! 

Fall harvest season has begun and the comfortable weather this past week has been refreshing. On the topic of weather, the USDA has provided more flexibility regarding disaster programs for flood-impacted producers in the northeast. the Farm service agency has authorized policy exceptions in all flood-impacted counties in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Vermont. For the full press release and more information go to https://www.fsa.usda.gov/news-room/news-releases/2023/usda-offers-disaster-program-flexibilities-for-flood-impacted-producers-in-the-northeast  

no further verified reports of late blight, except for those previously reported in New York state. to track late blight on your own go to https://usablight.org/map/  

Our Scout has confirmed the presence of corn leaf aphid on several farms in southern NH. These aphids can spread Maize dwarf mosaic virus and in high populations can stunt plants. Additionally, if populations are high enough, CLA can secrete large amounts of honeydew that promotes sooty mold. Sooty mold fungus can affect marketability of ears and of stalks sold for ornamental purposesSprays applied before 50 percent of the tassels emerge are more effective than later sprays. Some products that can be used to control CLA are acetamiprid (assail) and Flupyradifurone (Sivanto). 

For our trapping network, we are over the hump and are just starting to remove traps from some field locations. 

European corn borer (ECB) numbers are once again down this week. Peak flights are over for the year, and ECB numbers will most likely stay low for the remainder of the season. With whorl stage corn, larval feeding damage is characterized by tiny “shot holes” in the leaves. Eventually the larvae will bore into the developing tassel and stalks. The later season scouting procedure is the same but consider that you may be encountering FAW damage as well. Click the link to learn more about scouting and trapping. The results of our trapping efforts are recorded by town on the table below with ECB-NY and ECB-IA moth counts shown. In some cases, there are multiple traps within a town.  

Corn Earworm (CEW) catch was very high again this week, just like last. At this point in the season, most locations are on a 4-day spray schedule. CEW resistance to pyrethroid products (i.e. Warrior) is well documented in other regions and if you notice a lack of control, consider rotating pyrethroids (Group 3A) with products from a different chemical class. This is especially important for growers who rely solely on pyrethroids for CEW control. Blackhawk/Radiant (group 5) and Besiege/Coragen (groups 28, 3A) could make good rotation partners/alternative choices. If pyrethroids are to be used for control, the current recommendation is to use those products earlier in the growing season because resistance can build throughout the year. Also, control can vary from product to product within the pyrethroid class. The most resistance build up is seen with Warrior. If a pyrethroid is to be used, consider selecting a different Pyrethroid product, like Hero or Baythriod XL 

Fall Armyworm (FAW) catch hit its highest of the season this week. Damage is being reported in the latest whorl sage corn blocks. FAW damage is being reported in other New England states despite little or no moth catch. FAW larval feeding damage is characterized by large, ragged holes in leaves, and sawdust-like excrement. Large populations may kill or stunt young corn plants. Field scouting should begin once moths are captured at your farm or in your area. Click the link to more information on how to field scout. 

Western bean cutworm (WBC) catch was very low this week. We have reached the end of flight for the season. We will likely stop monitoring for this insect in two weeks. We currently do not have an economic threshold established for this pest in NH, but our trapping network is keeping an eye on populations. David Handley from the University of Maine advises to keep silking corn protected if trap numbers of WBC in your area are high, even if traps are catching very few CEW or FAW. This is because WBC behaves similarly to fall armyworm and corn earworm. Scout fields by examining the upper surfaces of the leaves at the top of the plant and leaves above and below the ear zone. Eggs are laid in masses and change from a cream color to lavender to dark purple as they age. Use the sun to your advantage and look for the egg mass shadows while scouting. Materials used for corn earworm control will also control western bean cutwormConsult the New England vegetable management guide for recommendations. 

Sweet corn pests weekly summary, 9/1/2023 

Table of Sweet corn pests weekly summary 9-1-23

Moths spray interval table

 

Overall Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) numbers have increased significantly as compared to last week. very high numbers in the field were only seen at one location in Concord. Other high traps counts mostly occurred with control traps in hedgerows or other non-treated areas. go to https://ag.umass.edu/fruit/resources/spotted-wing-drosophila-management for more management information. Trapping data is recorded in the table below, alongside the data for squash vine borer. 

Only three Squash vine borer (SVB) moths were caught this week in the southern/central New Hampshire area. Most susceptible plants are robust enough at this point in the season to escape further damage. 

Four Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) adults were caught this week. Two Nymphs were also caught at a location in Antrim. We currently do not have any thresholds established for BMSB but we continue to keep an eye on population levels in the state. For more great information on BMSB, go to https://www.stopbmsb.org/managing-bmsb/.   

SVB/SWD/BMSB weekly Summary, 9/1/2023 

SVB Weely Summary 9-1-23 table

Check back in each week as the season progresses to see the latest trapping data. Data for additional insect pests will be updated on a weekly basis. 

Thank you to all the growers who participate in the program!  

Upcoming Events: 

SEPTEMBER 20, 2023 | 8:00AM - 3:00PM 

OCTOBER 5, 2023 | 4:00 - 6:00PM 

 

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food integrated pest management program. This work is also supported in part by the Integrated Pest Management Crop Protection and Pest Management EIP grant no. 2021-70006-35477 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. 

 

 

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8/25/2023
(Aphids on corn, photo by Frank Peairs, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org)
(Aphids on corn, photo by Frank Peairs, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org) 

Hello Vegetable IPM Enthusiasts! 

Cucurbit downy mildew on cucumbers is rampant in Hillsborough County. Just as a reminder, applying preventive/broad spectrum fungicide controls (eg. chlorothalonil or copper) along with targeted fungicides before plants are systematic will provide better control than waiting for symptoms to appear. Margaret Tuttle McGrath from Cornell University has created a handy table that lists conventional control options for many cucurbits diseases. Check out the list Cucurbit Fungicide List 2020-NY (bpb-us-e1.wpmucdn.com). Always read the labels to confirm it is approved for use in NH. 

Late blight on solanaceous crops had also been reported in New York state. 

Our Scout has confirmed the presence of corn leaf aphid on several farms in southern NH. These aphids can spread Maize dwarf mosaic virus and in high populations can stunt plants. Additionally, if populations are high enough, CLA can secrete large amounts of honeydew that promotes sooty mold. Sooty mold fungus can affect marketability of ears and of stalks sold for ornamental purposesSprays applied before 50 percent of the tassels emerge are more effective than later sprays. some products that can be used to control CLA are acetamiprid (assail) and Flupyradifurone (Sivanto).  

European corn borer (ECB) numbers are one again down this week, with half the total catch as compared to last week. We are likely approaching the end of 2nd flight in southern NH. With whorl stage corn, larval feeding damage is characterized by tiny “shot holes” in the leaves. Eventually the larvae will bore into the developing tassel and stalks. The later season scouting procedure is the same but consider that you may be encountering FAW damage as well. Click the link to learn more about scouting and trapping. The results of our trapping efforts are recorded by town on the table below with ECB-NY and ECB-IA moth counts shown. In some cases, there are multiple traps within a town.  

Corn Earworm (CEW) total moth catch has drastically increased with one site reporting a catch of 91 moths in a week! That corresponds to the tightest spray schedule of every 3 days. At this point in the season, most locations are on a 4-day spray schedule. CEW resistance to pyrethroid products (i.e. Warrior) is well documented in other regions and if you notice a lack of control, consider rotating pyrethroids (Group 3A) with products from a different chemical class. This is especially important for growers who rely solely on pyrethroids for CEW control. Blackhawk/Radiant (group 5) and Besiege/Coragen (groups 28, 3A) could make good rotation partners/alternative choices. If pyrethroids are to be used for control, the current recommendation is to use those products earlier in the growing season because resistance can build throughout the year. Also, control can vary from product to product within the pyrethroid class. The most resistance build up is seen with Warrior. If a pyrethroid is to be used, consider selecting a different product, like Baythriod XL 

 Fall Armyworm (FAW) catch did bump up this week. Our scout has reported huge amounts of by-catch or “look alike” moths for the second week in a row. This can make counting and identifying FAW moths more difficult. FAW damage is being reported in other New England states despite little or no moth catch. FAW larval feeding damage is characterized by large, ragged holes in leaves, and sawdust-like excrement. Large populations may kill or stunt young corn plants. Field scouting should begin once moths are captured at your farm or in your area. Click the link to more information on how to field scout. 

Western bean cutworm (WBC) catch was down this week, suggesting that we are nearing the end of flight. We currently do not have an economic threshold established for this pest in NH, but our trapping network is keeping an eye on populations. David Handley from the University of Maine advises to keep silking corn protected if trap numbers of WBC in your area are high, even if traps are catching very few CEW or FAW. This is because WBC behaves similarly to fall armyworm and corn earworm. Scout fields by examining the upper surfaces of the leaves at the top of the plant and leaves above and below the ear zone. Eggs are laid in masses and change from a cream color to lavender to dark purple as they age. Use the sun to your advantage and look for the egg mass shadows while scouting. Materials used for corn earworm control will also control western bean cutwormConsult the New England vegetable management guide for recommendations. 

Graph
Graph

Overall Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) numbers have dropped, but a few scattered sites are reporting high catch. again, this is mostly occurring with control traps in hedgerows or other non-treated areas. go to https://ag.umass.edu/fruit/resources/spotted-wing-drosophila-management for more management information. Trapping data is recorded in the table below, alongside the data for squash vine borer. 

Only Two Squash vine borer (SVB) moths were caught this week in the southern/central New Hampshire area. Most susceptible plants are robust enough at this point in the season to escape further damage. 

Two Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) adults were caught this week. One Nymph was also caught at a location in Antrim. We currently do not have any thresholds established for BMSB but we continue to keep an eye on population levels in the state. For more great information on BMSB, go to https://www.stopbmsb.org/managing-bmsb/.   

graph

Check back in each week as the season progresses to see the latest trapping data. Data for additional insect pests will be updated on a weekly basis. 

Thank you to all the growers who participate in the program!  

 

Upcoming Events: 

SEPTEMBER 20, 2023 | 8:00AM - 3:00PM 

 

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food integrated pest management program. This work is also supported in part by the Integrated Pest Management Crop Protection and Pest Management EIP grant no. 2021-70006-35477 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. 

 

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8/18/2023
Suspected downy mildew on cucumber
Suspected downy mildew on cucumber. Photo by K. Quigley

 

Hello Vegetable IPM Enthusiasts! 

Recent rains have exacerbated fungal issues within the state. We have visually confirmed more cases of cucurbit downy mildew at several locations in Hillsborough County. Towns where symptoms were seen include Antrim, concord, Peterborough and Jaffery. All these sightings were on cucumber. Margaret Tuttle McGrath from Cornell University has created a handy table that lists conventional control options for many cucurbits diseases. Click this link for more information and control options. As always, check that any products you may use are registered for use in New Hampshire. 

European corn borer (ECB) numbers are down from last week at most trapping locations. With whorl stage corn, larval feeding damage is characterized by tiny “shot holes” in the leaves. Eventually the larvae will bore into the developing tassel and stalks. The later season scouting procedure is the same but consider that you may be encountering FAW damage as well. Click the link to learn more about scouting and trapping. The results of our trapping efforts are recorded by town on the table below with ECB-NY and ECB-IA moth counts shown. In some cases, there are multiple traps within a town.  

Corn Earworm (CEW) total moth catch tripled since last week! At this point in the season, most locations are on a 4 day spray schedule. CEW resistance to pyrethroid products (i.e. Warrior) is well documented in other regions and if you notice a lack of control, consider rotating pyrethroids (Group 3A) with products from a different chemical class. This is especially important for growers who rely solely on pyrethroids for CEW control. Blackhawk/Radiant (group 5) and Besiege/Coragen (groups 28, 3A) could make good rotation partners/alternative choices. If pyrethroids are to be used for control, the current recommendation is to use those products earlier in the growing season because resistance can build throughout the year. Also, control can vary from product to product within the pyrethroid class. The most resistance build up is seen with Warrior. If a pyrethroid is to be used, consider selecting a different product, like Baythriod XL 

Fall Armyworm (FAW) catch dropped off significantly this week, but our scout did report heavy by catch. This leads me to believe that conditions are ripe for other moth pests. FAW damage is being reported in other New England states despite little or no moth catch. FAW larval feeding damage is characterized by large, ragged holes in leaves, and sawdust-like excrement. Large populations may kill or stunt young corn plants. Field scouting should begin once moths are captured at your farm or in your area. Click the link to more information on how to field scout. 

Western bean cutworm (WBC) populations were reduced by almost half this week, suggesting that peak flight is over. We currently do not have an economic threshold established for this pest in NH, but our trapping network is keeping an eye on populations. David Handley from the University of Maine advises to keep silking corn protected if trap numbers of WBC in your area are high, even if traps are catching very few CEW or FAW. This is because WBC behaves similarly to fall armyworm and corn earworm. Scout fields by examining the upper surfaces of the leaves at the top of the plant and leaves above and below the ear zone. Eggs are laid in masses and change from a cream color to lavender to dark purple as they age. Use the sun to your advantage and look for the egg mass shadows while scouting. Our scout did not find very many egg masses this week. Materials used for corn earworm control will also control western bean cutworm.  Consult the New England vegetable management guide for recommendations.

Sweet corn pests weekly summary, 8/18/2023 

Sweet corn pests weekly summary, 8/18/2023
Moths

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) pressure dropped significantly this week in terms of total numbers. this is because one of our trapping locations has finished up harvest for the year, so we are collecting less data points. At the other sites still being monitored, pressure is high within controls and in raspberry plantings. go to https://ag.umass.edu/fruit/resources/spotted-wing-drosophila-management for more management information. Trapping data is recorded in the table below, alongside the data for squash vine borer. 

Squash vine borer (SVB) numbers continue to trend downward with no locations at threshold. This coincides with the expected life cycle of SVB. In late august there is sometimes another bump in trap catch, which could signify a second generation. For bush-type summer squash and pumpkins (including giant pumpkins), the recommended threshold is 5 SVB moths per trap per week. For vining type squash or pumpkins, we suggest a threshold of 12 moths per trap per week. The reason for this difference is because vine-type cucurbits can root or tiller in at each node along the vine. This allows the plant to uptake water and nutrients from more than just the main stem. SVB tends to bore into the main stem of cucurbit plants, creating a higher risk for bush type plants. If chemical controls are needed, try to spray at dusk and direct applications to the base of the plants. This may help reduce harm to European honeybees, but our native bees will still be at risk because they often reside in squash flowers at night. see Page 290 of the New England vegetable management guide  for SVB control recommendations. See results of our trapping efforts below. 

Two Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) adults were caught this week, right on schedule. We currently do not have any thresholds established for BMSB but we continue to keep an eye on population levels in the state. For more great information on BMSB, go to https://www.stopbmsb.org/managing-bmsb/.   

SVB/SWD/BMSB weekly Summary, 8/18/2023 

SVB/SWD/BMSB weekly Summary, 8/18/2023

Check back in each week as the season progresses to see the latest trapping data. Data for additional insect pests will be updated on a weekly basis. 

Thank you to all the growers who participate in the program!  

Upcoming Events: 

AUGUST 22, 2023 | 6:00 - 8:00PM 

AUGUST 23, 2023 | 4:00 - 6:00PM 

AUGUST 23, 2023 | 5:30 - 7:00PM 

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food integrated pest management program. This work is also supported in part by the Integrated Pest Management Crop Protection and Pest Management EIP grant no. 2021-70006-35477 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. 

 

 

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8/11/2023

 

Giant pumpkin leaves with Cucurbit Yellow Vine Decline

Giant pumpkin leaves with Cucurbit Yellow Vine Decline. Photo by K. Quigley.

Hello Vegetable IPM Enthusiasts! 

Fields are drying out in some locations around the state this week, but many spots are still receiving excessive moisture. Nitrogen deficient crops are commonplace this season due to nutrient runoff. Growers are busy harvesting and sidedressing what crops can be saved. Nitrogen deficiency can express itself as yellow, chlorotic growth, particularly on the older leaves. But not all yellowing is nitrogen deficiencyThe above picture shows what appears to be (and what I thought was) a nitrogen deficient giant pumpkin plant, but after further investigation, this was not the case. This unfortunate plant was infected by the bacterium Serratia marcescens, which causes the disease complex known as cucurbit yellow vine decline (CYVD). CYVD is vectored, or spread, by squash bugs so good squash bug control should eliminate much of the risk. This is fairly uncommon in commercial production within NH but may be one to watch out for. Thank you to our friends at Iowa state for lab confirming CYVD for us! Click this link for more information and cultural control options. 

We are amid the 2nd gen flight of European corn borer (ECB). Almost all trapping locations are reporting low catch number, except for the Litchfield area. Only one field scouted location in Weare was over the 15 % pretassel damage threshold. With whorl stage corn, larval feeding damage is characterized by tiny “shot holes” in the leaves. Eventually the larvae will bore into the developing tassel and stalks. The later season scouting procedure is the same but consider that you may be encountering FAW damage as well. Click on the link for more information on how to scout whorl/pretassel stage corn. The results of our trapping efforts are recorded by town on the table below with ECB-NY and ECB-IA moth counts shown. In some cases, there are multiple traps within a town.  

Corn Earworm (CEW) moth numbers ticked up this week with several locations on 4-day spray schedules for silking cornCEW resistance to pyrethroid products (i.e. Warrior) is well documented in other regions and if you notice a lack of control, consider rotating pyrethroids (Group 3A) with products from a different chemical class. This is especially important for growers who rely solely on pyrethroids for CEW control. Blackhawk/Radiant (group 5) and Besiege/Coragen (groups 28, 3A) could make good rotation partners/alternative choices. If pyrethroids are to be used for control, the current recommendation is to use those products earlier in the growing season because resistance can build throughout the year. 

Total Fall Armyworm (FAW) catch increased slightly this week but only location in Litchfield was over the pheromone trap threshold of 3 moths per week. FAW damage is being reported in other New England states despite little or no moth catch. FAW larval feeding damage is characterized by large, ragged holes in leaves, and sawdust-like excrement. Large populations may kill or stunt young corn plants. Field scouting should begin once moths are captured at your farm or in your area. For more information on how to field scout, click HERE. 

Western bean cutworm (WBC) populations are about the same as last week. Traps counts have been higher than ever this year. We currently do not have an economic threshold established for this pest in NH, but our trapping network is keeping an eye on populations. David Handley from the University of Maine advises to keep silking corn protected if trap numbers of WBC in your area are high, even if traps are catching very few CEW or FAW. This is because WBC behaves similarly to fall armyworm and corn earworm. Scout fields by examining the upper surfaces of the leaves at the top of the plant and leaves above and below the ear zone. Eggs are laid in masses and change from a cream color to lavender to dark purple as they age. Use the sun to your advantage and look for the egg mass shadows while scouting. Materials used for corn earworm control will also control western bean cutworm.  Consult the New England Vegetable Guide for recommendations. 

Sweet corn pests weekly summary, 8/10/2023 

 

Sweet corn pests weekly summary for August 10, 2023, by town.
 
Moth Spray interval

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) pressure is still high this week, with a slight increase in overall trap counts over last. One control location in Litchfield caught 80 flies! Infestation levels in plantings were significantly less but still present. This lets us know that conditions are ideal for SWD infestation and to not let up on control programs. Click HERE for more management information. Trapping data is recorded in the table below, alongside the data for squash vine borer. 

Squash vine borer (SVB) numbers continue to trend downward with only one location at threshold. This coincides with the expected life cycle of SVB. In late august there is sometimes another bump in trap catch, which could signify a second generation. For bush-type summer squash and pumpkins (including giant pumpkins), the recommended threshold is 5 SVB moths per trap per week. For vining type squash or pumpkins, we suggest a threshold of 12 moths per trap per week. The reason for this difference is because vine-type cucurbits can root or tiller in at each node along the vine. This allows the plant to uptake water and nutrients from more than just the main stem. SVB tends to bore into the main stem of cucurbit plants, creating a higher risk for bush type plants. If chemical controls are needed, try to spray at dusk and direct applications to the base of the plants. This may help reduce harm to European honeybees, but our native bees will still be at risk because they often reside in squash flowers at night. see Page 290 of the New England vegetable management guide  for SVB control recommendations. See results of our trapping efforts below. 

SVB/SWD weekly Summary, 8/10/2023 

SVB/SWB Weekly Summary for August 10, 2023, by town

Five Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) adults were caught this week, right on schedule. We currently do not have any thresholds established for BMSB but we continue to keep an eye on population levels in the state. For more great information on BMSB, click HERE.   

Check back in each week as the season progresses to see the latest trapping data. Data for additional insect pests will be updated on a weekly basis. 

Thank you to all the growers who participate in the program!  

Upcoming Events: 

AUGUST 15, 2023 | 5:30 - 7:30PM 

AUGUST 17, 2023 | 5:30 - 7:30PM 

AUGUST 22, 2023 | 6:00 - 8:00PM 

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food integrated pest management program. This work is also supported in part by the Integrated Pest Management Crop Protection and Pest Management EIP grant no. 2021-70006-35477 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. 

 

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8/04/2023
 
Western Bean Cutworm Egg Mass
Western bean cutworm egg mass. Photo by Frank Peairs, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org

Hello Vegetable IPM Enthusiasts! 

More rain today brings the potential for further disease spread. Field conditions in some locations are poor and we have witnessed a lot of plants succumbing to pathogens. When and if the decision is made to put a field under, consider following up immediately with a cover crop. A few cover crop options that could be planted from now until early-mid September are Field peas, tillage radish and oats. Click HERE for a handy cover crop guide published by the NRCS. The guide details optimal planting dates by region and the characteristics of various cover crop options. 

The second flight of European corn borer (ECB) has begun in Southern NH. Continue to keep an eye out for second generation caterpillars. With whorl stage corn, larval feeding damage is characterized by tiny “shot holes” in the leaves. Eventually the larvae will bore into the developing tassel and stalks. the later season scouting procedure is the same but consider that you may be encountering FAW damage as well. Click HERE for information on how to scout whorl/pretassel stage corn. The results of our trapping efforts are recorded by town on the table below with ECB-NY and ECB-IA moth counts shown. In some cases, there are multiple traps within a town.  

Corn Earworm (CEW) moth numbers are low. Most locations are on a 5-6 day spray schedule. Cooler temperatures have allowed for slightly more forgiving spray scheduleAs a reminder, Populations can change quickly so continue to stay vigilant! We have heard several reports of significant CEW Damage despite relatively little catch the last few weeks. Rainy weather has made it difficult for growers to time sprays. CEW resistance to pyrethroid products (i.e. Warrior) is well documented in other regions and if you notice a lack of control, consider rotating pyrethroids (Group 3A) with products from a different chemical class. This is especially important for growers who rely solely on pyrethroids for CEW control. Blackhawk/Radiant (group 5) and Besiege/Coragen (groups 28, 3A) could make good rotation partners/alternative choices.  

Total Fall Armyworm (FAW) catch has remained about the same this week. One location in Hollis did see a spike in catch and reported 6 moths this week. Despite overall low catch numbers, spots of working FAW and what is likely common armyworm in tassel stage corn (before tassel fully emerges) have been observed. FAW damage is being reported in other New England states despite little or no moth catch. FAW feeding damage is characterized by large, ragged holes in leaves, and sawdust-like excrement. Large populations may kill or stunt young corn plants. Field scouting should begin once moths are captured at your farm or in your area. For more information on how to field scout, click HERE. 

Western bean cutworm (WBC) populations really shot up this week. Trap counts have been higher than ever. Some growers in New York caught over 400 moths in a single trap! Hopefully we do not see that level of infestation anytime soon. Scout fields by examining the upper surfaces of the leaves at the top of the plant and leaves above and below the ear zone. Eggs are laid in masses and change from a cream color to lavender to dark purple as they age. Use the sun to your advantage and look for the egg mass shadows while scouting. Materials used for corn earworm control will also control western bean cutworm. We currently do not have an economic threshold established for this pest in NH, but our trapping network is keeping an eye on populations.  Consult the New England Vegetable Guide for recommendations. 

Sweet corn pests weekly summary, 8/4/2023 

Sweet corn pests summary for 8-4-2023

 

Moth Spray interval

 

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) pressure increased significantly this week. Trap catches of over 40 flies were observed at 4 separate locations (Litchfield, concord and two in Hollis). However, it is important to note that these high levels of infestation were found in our control traps and not in plantings. Infestation levels in planting were significantly less but still present. This lets us know that conditions are ideal for SWD infestation and to not let up on control programs. Click HERE for more management information. Trapping data is recorded in the table below, alongside the data for squash vine borer. 

Squash vine borer (SVB) catch really dropped off this week. Only three locations in Southern Nh were over threshold. This coincides with the expected life cycle of SVB. In late august there is sometimes another bump in trap catch, which could signify a second generation. For bush-type summer squash and pumpkins (including giant pumpkins), the recommended threshold is 5 SVB moths per trap per week. For vining type squash or pumpkins, we suggest a threshold of 12 moths per trap per week. The reason for this difference is because vine-type cucurbits can root or tiller in at each node along the vine. This allows the plant to uptake water and nutrients from more than just the main stem. SVB tends to bore into the main stem of cucurbit plants, creating a higher risk for bush type plants. If chemical controls are needed, try to spray at dusk and direct applications to the base of the plants. This may help reduce harm to European honeybees, but our native bees will still be at risk because they often reside in squash flowers at night. see Page 290 of the New England vegetable management guide  for SVB control recommendations. See results of our trapping efforts below. 

SVB/SWD weekly Summary, 8/4/2023 

SVB Weekly Summary for 8-4-2023

Still zero Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) adults or nymphs caught this week. We typically start to see in an increase in BMSB activity in Early to mid-August. 

Squash bugs are still being observed at several locations, particularly within low spray management programs. Adults and nymphs feed by inserting their stylets (sharp, sucking mouthparts) and sucking sap from plant tissue. Plant feeding damage resembles that of bacterial wilt. Squash bugs can also cause scarring damage on fruits, reducing marketability.  

Check back in each week as the season progresses to see the latest trapping data. Data for additional insect pests will be updated on a weekly basis. 

Thank you to all the growers who participate in the program!  

Upcoming Events: 

AUGUST 15, 2023 | 5:30 - 7:30PM 

AUGUST 17, 2023 | 5:30 - 7:30PM 

AUGUST 22, 2023 | 6:00 - 8:00PM 

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food integrated pest management program. This work is also supported in part by the Integrated Pest Management Crop Protection and Pest Management EIP grant no. 2021-70006-35477 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. 

 

 

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7/28/2023
corn earworm larvae
Variability among corn earworm larvae. Photo credit: Richard Clark II.

Fields are still drying out and with the increase in temperature and humidity, conditions are ideal for plant pathogen spread. If you suspect plant pathogens are lurking on your farm, plant samples can be submitted to UNH Plant diagnostic lab for confirmation. Click HERE for more information about our lab. If you suspect soil born pathogens are present, limit the spread of soil and equipment from field to field until confirmed. Pressure washing equipment and tires, field isolation and picking your “worse off” fields last can all help to limit pathogen spread. 

A few European corn borer (ECB) trapping sites reported adult moths this week. This could signal that we are in the 2nd flight of ECB in southern NH, so keep an eye out for damage. This week our IPM scout observed damage levels between 15-30 % at some locations. With whorl stage corn, larval feeding damage is characterized by tiny “shot holes” in the leaves. Eventually the larvae will bore into the developing tassel and stalks. Click HERE for information on how to scout whorl stage corn. The results of our trapping efforts are recorded by town on the table below with ECB-NY and ECB-IA moth counts shown. In some cases, there are multiple traps within a town.  

Corn Earworm (CEW) moth numbers are relatively low. Most locations are on a 4-6 day spray schedule. Populations can change quickly with moths riding in on the many storm fronts that have been occurring. We have heard several reports of significant CEW Damage despite relatively little catch the last couple of weeks. Rainy weather has made it difficult for growers to time sprays. CEW resistance to pyrethroid products (i.e. Warrior) is well documented in other regions and if you notice a lack of control, consider rotating pyrethroids (Group 3A) with products from a different chemical class. This is especially important for growers who rely solely on pyrethroids for CEW control. Blackhawk/Radiant (group 5) and Besiege/Coragen (groups 28, 3A) could make good rotation partners/alternative choices.  

Several locations have Fall Armyworm (FAW) catch this week. Despite low catch numbers, spots of working FAW and what is likely common armyworm in tassel stage corn (before tassel fully emerges) have been observed. FAW damage is being reported in other New England states despite little or no moth catch. FAW feeding damage is characterized by large, ragged holes in leaves, and sawdust-like excrement. Large populations may kill or stunt young corn plants. Field scouting should begin once moths are captured at your farm or in your area. For more information on how to field scout, click HERE. 

Western bean cutworm (WBC) populations continue to climb this week. Scout fields by examining the upper surfaces of the leaves at the top of the plant and leaves above and below the ear zone. Eggs are laid in masses and change from a cream color to lavender to dark purple as they age. Use the sun to your advantage and look for the egg mass shadows while scouting. Materials used for corn earworm control will also control western bean cutworm. We currently do not have an economic threshold established for this pest, but our trapping network is keeping an eye on populations. Consult the New England Vegetable Guide for recommendations. 

Sweet corn pests weekly summary, 7/28/2023 

Weekly summary for 7-28-23

 

IPM

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) pressure increased significantly this week. Click HERE for more management information. Trapping data is recorded in the table below, alongside the data for squash vine borer. 

Squash vine borer (SVB) trap catch dropped at almost all locations this week. Despite that, numbers are still high. Most growers were able to get onto fields this week to spray, if needed. The number of moths captured with pheromone traps can be used to decide whether an insecticide treatment is required or not. For bush-type summer squash and pumpkins (including giant pumpkins), the recommended threshold is 5 SVB moths per trap per week. For vining type squash or pumpkins, we suggest a threshold of 12 moths per trap per week. The reason for this difference is because vine-type cucurbits can root or tiller in at each node along the vine. This allows the plant to uptake water and nutrients from more than just the main stem. SVB tends to bore into the main stem of cucurbit plants, creating a higher risk for bush type plants. If chemical controls are needed, try to spray at dusk and direct applications to the base of the plants. This may help reduce harm to European honeybees, but our native bees will still be at risk because they often reside in squash flowers at night. see Page 290 of the New England vegetable management guide  for SVB control recommendations. See results of our trapping efforts below. 

SVB/SWD weekly Summary, 7/28/2023 

SWD/SVB Weekly Summary for 7-28-2023

 Zero Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) adults or nymphs were caught this week. We typically start to see in an increase in BMSB activity in Early to mid-August. 

Squash bugs are still being observed at several locations, particularly within low spray management programs. Adults and nymphs feed by inserting their stylets (sharp, sucking mouthparts) and sucking sap from plant tissue. Plant feeding damage resembles that of bacterial wilt. Squash bugs can also cause scarring damage on fruits, reducing marketability.  

Check back in each week as the season progresses to see the latest trapping data. Data for additional insect pests will be updated on a weekly basis. 

Thank you to all the growers who participate in the program!  

 

Upcoming Events: 

AUGUST 3, 2023 | 5:30 - 7:30PM 

AUGUST 3, 2023 | 5:30 - 7:30PM 

AUGUST 17, 2023 | 5:30 - 7:30PM 

AUGUST 22, 2023 | 6:00 - 8:00PM 

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food integrated pest management program. This work is also supported in part by the Integrated Pest Management Crop Protection and Pest Management EIP grant no. 2021-70006-35477 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. 

 

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7/21/2023

 

Suspected Phytophthora in Squash. Photo by Shuresh Ghimire, UConn
(Suspected Phytophthora in Squash. Photo by Shuresh Ghimire, UConn) 

Hello Vegetable IPM Enthusiasts!

Saturated soil conditions continue to create an ideal environment for soil borne pathogens. In Hillsborough County, we have two confirmed cases of Phytophthora capsici, with many more suspected cases. Phytophthora is a water mold that can lie waiting in the soil for years until the conditions are favorable. This year conditions are favorable to say the least. Once symptoms are visible, control measures are ineffective. The best way to combat this potentially devastating pathogen is to use preventive measures. Raised beds, soil applied fungicides and equipment sanitation are a few key components of a Phytophthora IPM plan. Check out this Field Scouting Guide: Phytophthora - Growing Produce for more information on Phytophthora field identification and management. The article features insights from Margaret Tuttle McGrath from Cornell University and provides a handy fungicide table. Always check the label (or click here) to see if pesticide products are registered for use in New Hampshire.

European corn borer (ECB) trap numbers are again almost non-existent. UMass has reported a slight uptick in ECB numbers, perhaps indicating the start of a second flight in Massachusetts. This indicates New Hampshire will not be too far behind. With whorl stage corn, larval feeding damage is characterized by tiny “shot holes” in the leaves. Eventually the larvae will bore into the developing tassel and stalks. Click HERE for information on how to scout whorl stage corn. The results of our trapping efforts are recorded by town on the table below with ECB-NY and ECB-IA moth counts shown. In some cases, there are multiple traps within a town. Interestingly, our IPM scout did observe by-catch of carrot maggot moths within the ECB traps.

Corn Earworm (CEW) moth numbers have dropped at most locations this week. Most locations are on a 5-6 day spray schedule with a couple notable exceptions. Populations can change quickly with moths riding in on the many storm fronts that have been occurring. Remember that CEW damage is incurred when the crop is in silk. Even if you are at the CEW spray threshold (see schedule below), chemical intervention is not warranted if you’re not in silk. See below for CEW Spray thresholds (fresh silk) while using pheromone traps.

13 total Western bean cutworm (WBC) moths were caught between two locations in Hollis. 14 moths were caught in Concord. One moth each was caught in Antrim, Jaffrey, and Mason. Starting next week, trapping data will be recorded in the usual sweet corn pest table below. Scout fields by examining the upper surfaces of the leaves at the top of the plant, and leaves above and below the ear zone. Eggs are laid in masses and change from a cream color to lavender to dark purple as they age. Materials used for corn earworm control will also control western bean cutworm. We currently do not have an economic threshold established for this pest, but our trapping network is keeping an eye on populations. Consult the New England Vegetable Guide for recommendations.

Our first Fall Armyworm (FAW) moths were caught this week in Hollis, Concord and Weare. FAW numbers will now be reported in the table below, alongside the other sweet corn pest data. FAW moths migrate from the south each year, usually arriving sometime in mid-July or August. Economic damage is done in the larval stage. FAW feeding damage is characterized by large, ragged holes in leaves, and sawdust-like excrement. Large populations may kill or stunt young corn plants. Field scouting should begin once moths are captured at your farm or in your area. For more information on how to field scout, click HERE.

7/21 IPM

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) trapping locations reported low numbers in most locations. Click HERE for more management information. Trapping data is recorded in the table below, alongside the data for squash vine borer.

IPM 2 721

Squash vine borer (SVB) trap catches are high but overall numbers are down from last week. Most growers were able to get onto fields this week to spray, if needed. The number of moths captured with pheromone traps can be used to decide whether an insecticide treatment is required or not. For bush-type summer squash and pumpkins (including giant pumpkins), the recommended threshold is 5 SVB moths per trap per week. For vining type squash or pumpkins, we suggest a threshold of 12 moths per trap per week. The reason for this difference is because vine-type cucurbits can root or tiller in at each node along the vine. This allows the plant to uptake water and nutrients from more than just the main stem. SVB tends to bore into the main stem of cucurbit plants, creating a higher risk for bush type plants. If chemical controls are needed, try to spray at dusk and direct applications to the base of the plants. This may help reduce harm to European honeybees, but our native bees will still be at risk because they often reside in squash flowers at night. see Page 290 of the New England vegetable management guide  for SVB control recommendations. See results of our trapping efforts below.

IPM 3

Zero Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) adults or nymphs were caught this week.

Check back in each week as the season progresses to see the latest trapping data. Data for additional insect pests will be updated on a weekly basis. 

Thank you to all the growers who participate in the program! 

Upcoming Meetings:

JULY 26, 2023 | 11:00AM - 1:00PM

Manure Management with Bedded Packs

AUGUST 3, 2023 | 5:30 - 7:30PM

Blueberry IPM Twilight Meeting at Heron Pond Farm

AUGUST 3, 2023 | 5:30 - 7:30PM

Growing Grains for Livestock Feed

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food integrated pest management program. This work is also supported in part by the Integrated Pest Management Crop Protection and Pest Management EIP grant no. 2021-70006-35477 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

 

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7/14/2023

 

badly flooded squash field. note the water line on the hedgerow in the background
Badly flooded squash field. Note the water line on the hedgerow in the background. Photo: K. Quigley

Hello Vegetable IPM Enthusiasts! 

Excessive rains and flooding have really taken a toll on crops and made field conditions very difficult. Click HERE for updated information if you have fields that were flooded or experienced ponding. 

European corn borer (ECB) trap numbers are almost non-existent. Based off the past few weeks of trap numbers, we are at the end of first flight in southern NH. Larval feeding damage was low at most farm sites. With whorl stage corn, larval feeding damage is characterized by tiny “shot holes” in the leaves. Eventually the larvae will bore into the developing tassel and stalks. Click HERE for information on how to scout whorl stage corn. The results of our trapping efforts are recorded by town on the table below with ECB-NY and ECB-IA moth counts shown. In some cases, there are multiple traps within a town 

Corn Earworm (CEW) moths were caught at almost all locations this week. Our Scout installed 12 more CEW traps last week and the traps counts are reflected below. The recent storm fronts that have rolled through have brought in high numbers of moths. Populations can change quickly with moths riding in on the many storm fronts that have been occurring. Remember that CEW damage is incurred when the crop is in silk. Even if you are at the CEW spray threshold (See schedule below), chemical intervention is not warranted if you’re not in silk. See below for CEW Spray thresholds (fresh silk) while using pheromone traps.  

A total of three Western bean cutworm moths were caught this week. One moth each in Concord, New Ipswich and Jaffrey. Scout fields by examining the upper surfaces of the leaves at the top of the plant, and leaves above and below the ear zone. Eggs are laid in masses and change from a cream color to lavender to dark purple as they age. Materials used for corn earworm control will also control western bean cutworm. Consult theNew England Vegetable Guide for recommendations. 

We now have twenty (20) Fall Armyworm (FAW) traps online around the state that reported zeros this week. 

European corn borer/CEW weekly summary, 7/14/2023 

IPM

IPM 2 721

potted wing drosophila (SWD) trapping locations reported low to moderate numbers in some locations. Click HERE for more management informationWe now have several more traps installed and the trapping data is recorded in the table below, alongside the data for squash vine borer. 

Squash vine borer (SVB) trap catches are still high, with most monitoring sites reporting. Most growers saw an increase due to wet conditions limiting field access for spraying. The number of moths captured with pheromone traps can be used to decide whether or not an insecticide treatment is required. For bush-type summer squash and pumpkins (including giant pumpkins), the recommended threshold is 5 SVB moths per trap per week. For vining type squash or pumpkins, we suggest a threshold of 12 moths per trap per week. The difference is because vine-type cucurbits can root or tiller in at each node along the vine. This allows the plant to uptake water and nutrients from more than just the main stem. SVB tends to bore into the main stem of cucurbit plants, creating a higher risk for bush type plants. If Chemical controls are needed, try to spray at dusk and direct applications to the base of the plants. This may help reduce harm to European honeybees, but our native bees will still be at risk because they often reside in squash flowers at night. see Page 290 of the New England vegetable management guide  for SVB control recommendations. See results of our trapping efforts below. 

 

IPM

Squash Bug adults have been very active again this week and we’ve seen egg masses at several farms in southern NH. 

Zero Brown Marmorated Stink bug (BMSB) adults or nymphs were caught this week. 

Check back in each week as the season progresses to see the latest trapping data. Data for additional insect pests will be updated on a weekly basis. 

Thank you to all the growers who participate in the program!  

Upcoming Meetings:  

July 19th, 2023  

July 19th, 2023 

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food integrated pest management program. This work is also supported in part by the Integrated Pest Management Crop Protection and Pest Management EIP grant no. 2021-70006-35477 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. 

 

 

 

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7/07/2023
squash bug adults on zucchini
Squash bug adults on zucchini. Photo by Kyle Quigley.

 Hello Vegetable IPM Enthusiasts! 

European corn borer (ECB) trap numbers are almost non-existent. Based off the past few weeks of trap numbers, we are at the end of first flight in southern NH. Larval feeding damage was low at most farm sites, with exceptions in the Litchfield-Hudson Area. With whorl stage corn, larval feeding damage is characterized by tiny “shot holes” in the leaves. Eventually the larvae will bore into the developing tassel and stalks. Click HERE for information on how to scout whorl stage corn. The results of our trapping efforts are recorded by town on the table below with ECB-NY and ECB-IA moth counts shown. In some cases, there are multiple traps within a town 

Corn Earworm (CEW) moths were caught at many locations this week. The recent storm fronts that have rolled through have brought in high numbers of moths. Populations can change quickly with moths riding in on the many storm fronts that have been occurring. Remember that CEW damage is incurred when the crop is in silk. Even if you are at the CEW spray threshold (See schedule below), chemical intervention is not warranted if you’re not in silk. See below for CEW Spray thresholds (fresh silk) while using pheromone traps.  

Four Western Bean Cutworm (WBC) moths were caught in a trap in Hollis. One moth was caught in a trap in Mason. Scout tasseling fields by examining the upper surfaces of the leaves at the top of the plant, and leaves above and below the ear zone. Eggs are laid in masses and change from a cream color to lavender to dark purple as they age. Examine 20 consecutive plants at five locations in the field. If you find more than 4% of plants have eggs or small larvae, consider protecting sweet corn when 90-95% of plants are at tassel. Materials used for corn earworm control will also control western bean cutworm. Consult theNew England Vegetable Guide for recommendations. 

We Have three Fall Armyworm (FAW) traps online in Hollis that reported zeros this week. 

European corn borer/CEW weekly summary, 7/8/2023 

Town 

# Traps(ECB) 

Moth count 

(NY) 

Moth Count 

(IOWA) 

# Traps(CEW) 

CEW 

Moths 

Milford 

4 

0 

0 

- 

- 

Peterborough 

2 

0 

0 

- 

- 

Antrim 

2 

0 

0 

- 

- 

Mason 

2 

0 

0 

- 

- 

Amherst 

2 

0 

0 

- 

- 

Litchfield 

4 

0 

0 

- 

- 

Hollis 

10 

0 

0 

3 

78 

Hudson 

2 

0 

0 

- 

 -

Goffstown 

2 

0 

0 

- 

- 

New Boston 

2 

0 

0 

- 

- 

Weare 

4 

0 

0 

- 

- 

Concord 

2 

0

0 

- 

- 

Jaffrey 

2 

0 

0 

 
 

- 

 
 

- 

New Ipswich 

2 

0 

0 

- 

- 

Conway 

2 

0 

0 

- 

- 

Rollinsford 

2 

4 

0 

1 

39 

Meredith 

2 

0 

0 

1 

12 

Claremont 

2 

0 

1 

- 

- 

 

Moths/week 

Moths/night 

Spray interval 

0.0-1.4 

0.0-0.2 

No spray 

1.5-3.5 

0.3-0.5 

Spray every 6 days 

3.6-7.0 

0.6-1.0 

Spray every 5 days 

7.1-91 

1.1-13.0 

Spray every 4 days 

91+ 13+

Spray every 3 days 

 

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) trapping locations reported very High numbers in some locations. 50 SWD flies were caught on a red sticky card trap within raspberry in Hollis and 40 at a separate location nearby. 1 SWD was caught in a hedgerow in Litchfield. We have three liquid traps deployed at one farm in Concord, reporting a catch of 8, 0 and 5 flies. Click HERE for more management information.   

Squash vine borer (SVB) trap catches REALLY shot up again this week, with most monitoring sites reporting. Most growers saw an increase due to wet conditions limiting field access for spraying. The number of moths captured with pheromone traps can be used to decide whether or not an insecticide treatment is required. For bush-type summer squash and pumpkins (including giant pumpkins), the recommended threshold is 5 SVB moths per trap per week. For vining type squash or pumpkins, we suggest a threshold of 12 moths per trap per week. The difference is because vine-type cucurbits can root or tiller in at each node along the vine. This allows the plant to uptake water and nutrients from more than just the main stem. SVB tends to bore into the main stem of cucurbit plants, creating a higher risk for bush type plants. If Chemical controls are needed, try to spray at dusk and direct applications to the base of the plants. This may help reduce harm to European honeybees, but our native bees will still be at risk because they often reside in squash flowers at night. see Page 290 of the New England vegetable management guide  for SVB control recommendations. See results of our trapping efforts below. 

SVB Summary for 7/8/23 

Town 

# Traps 

SVB Catch 

Milford 

2 

4 

Antrim 

1 

10 

Mason 

1 

18 

Amherst 

1 

2 

Litchfield 

2 

54 

Hollis 

3 

18 

Hudson 

1 

6 

Goffstown 

1 

11 

New Boston 

1 

3 

Concord 

1 

25 

Loudon 

1 

20 

Peterborough 

1 

9 

Conway 

1 

2 

Claremont 

1 

1 

Jaffrey 

1 

1 

 

Squash Bug adults have been very active this week and we’ve seen egg masses at several farms in southern NH. 

One Brown Marmorated Stink bug (BMSB) Adult was caught in Antrim. 

Check back in each week as the season progresses to see the latest trapping data. Data for additional insect pests will be updated on a weekly basis. 

Thank you to all the growers who participate in the program!  

Upcoming Meetings:  

July 10th, 2023 

 

July 11th, 2023 

 

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food integrated pest management program. This work is also supported in part by the Integrated Pest Management Crop Protection and Pest Management EIP grant no. 2021-70006-35477 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. 

 

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6/30/2023
Squash vine borer Larvae
Squash vine borer Larvae 
Gerald Holmes, Strawberry Center, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, Bugwood.org 

Hello Vegetable IPM Enthusiasts! 

Cucurbit downy mildew (CDM) has been reported in New Jersey and Quebec recently. No local reports of Cucurbit downy mildew have come in yet but it may be a good idea to get your susceptible crops covered with a protectant fungicide if you haven’t done so already. Copper or chlorothalonil (initiate 720, bravo) are two potential options. To track CDM reports around the county, check in HERE 

European corn borer (ECB) trap numbers continue to dwindle. Based off the past few weeks of trap numbers, we are close to the end of first flight in southern NH (see chart below picturing ECB-NY catch over time). Larval feeding damage was down at most farm sites. With whorl stage corn, larval feeding damage is characterized by tiny “shot holes” in the leaves. Eventually the larvae will bore into the developing tassel and stalks. If you have corn in whorl or later, scouting now for damage is highly recommended. Click HERE for information on how to scout whorl stage corn. The results of our trapping efforts are recorded by town on the table below with ECB-NY and ECB-IA moth counts shown. In some cases, there are multiple traps within a town 

European corn borer weekly summary, 6/30/2023 

Town 

# Traps 

Moth count 

(NY) 

Moth Count 

(IOWA) 

Milford 

4 

1 

0 

Peterborough 

2 

0 

0 

Antrim 

2 

0 

0 

Mason 

2 

0 

0 

Amherst 

2 

0 

0 

Litchfield 

4 

0 

0 

Hollis 

10 

14 

0 

Hudson 

2 

3 

0 

Goffstown 

2 

0 

0 

New Boston 

2 

1 

0 

Weare 

4 

0 

0 

Concord 

2 

0 

0 

Jaffrey 

2 

0 

0 

New Ipswich 

2 

2 

0 

Conway 

2 

0 

0 

Rollinsford 

2 

6 

0 

Meredith 

2 

0 

0 

       

Corn Earworm (CEW) moths were caught at two separate locations in Hollis this week. One trap contained 5 moths and the other contained 2. Another site in Rollinsford caught 4 moths in one night. Our IPM also was able to visually ID a moth inside of a whorl in Hudson. Massachusetts CEW moth catches are also relatively low, with the exception of one location in Worcester County. Traps numbers in NH may be low at this moment but consider that populations can change quickly with moths riding in on the many storm fronts that have been occurring. Remember that CEW damage is incurred when the crop is in silk. Even if you are at the CEW spray threshold (See schedule below), chemical intervention is not warranted if you’re not in silk. See below for CEW Spray thresholds (fresh silk) while using pheromone traps. 

Moths/week 

Moths/night 

Spray interval 

0.0-1.4 

0.0-0.2 

No spray 

1.5-3.5 

0.3-0.5 

Spray every 6 days 

3.6-7.0 

0.6-1.0 

Spray every 5 days 

7.1-91 

1.1-13.0 

Spray every 4 days 

91 + 

13+ 

Spray every 3 days 

     

This week, our IPM scout checked six spotted wing drosophila (SWD) traps at locations in concord, Litchfield and Hollis. No SWD flies were caught yet again! I suspect that we may have some catch next week, so be sure to tune back in and see (hopefully I am wrong). 

Two Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) adults were caught in Antrim this week within our sentinel monitoring program. We currently do not have any thresholds established for BMSB but we continue to keep an eye on population levels in the state. For more great information on BMSB, click HERE.   

Squash vine borer (SVB) trap catches REALLY shot up this week, with most monitoring sites reporting. The number of moths captured with pheromone traps can be used to decide whether or not an insecticide treatment is required. For bush-type summer squash and pumpkins (including giant pumpkins), the recommended threshold is 5 SVB moths per trap per week. For vining type squash or pumpkins, we suggest a threshold of 12 moths per trap per week. The difference is because vine-type cucurbits can root or tiller in at each node along the vine. This allows the plant to uptake water and nutrients from more than just the main stem. SVB tends to bore into the main stem of cucurbit plants, creating a higher risk for bush type plants. If Chemical controls are needed, try to spray at dusk and direct applications to the base of the plants. This may help reduce harm to European honeybees, but our native bees will still be at risk because they often reside in squash flowers at night. see Page 290 of the New England vegetable management guide  for SVB control recommendations. See results of our trapping efforts for this week. 

SVB Summary for 6/30/23 

Town 

# Traps 

SVB Catch 

Milford 

2 

1 

Antrim 

1 

4 

Mason 

1 

1 

Amherst 

1 

0 

Litchfield 

2 

12 

Hollis 

3 

10 

Hudson 

1 

0 

Goffstown 

1 

3 

New Boston 

1 

0 

Concord 

1 

3 

Loudon 

1 

3 

Conway 

1 

0 

Claremont 

1 

0 

Check back in each week as the season progresses to see the latest trapping data. Data for additional insect pests will be updated on a weekly basis.Thank you to all the growers who participate in the program!  

Upcoming Meetings:  

July 5th, 2023 

July 10th, 2023 

July 11th, 2023 

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food integrated pest management program. This work is also supported in part by the Integrated Pest Management Crop Protection and Pest Management EIP grant no. 2021-70006-35477 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. 

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6/23/2023

slow growth of corn due to cooler, wet temperatures
Taken last week, slow growing corn caused by cool, wet weather. Photo by Kyle Quigley.

Hello Vegetable IPM enthusiasts! 

European Corn Borer (ECB) trap numbers continue to trend downwards in most of our monitoring locations. This is likely due to timely insecticide applications. We also could be nearing the end of the first flight in southern NH. Corn development is still delayed with the depressed temperatures we’ve had. Significant larval feeding damage was detected this week in whorl stage corn. With whorl stage corn, larval feeding damage is characterized by tiny “shot holes” in the leaves. Eventually the larvae will bore into the developing tassel and stalks. If you have corn in whorl or later, scouting now for damage is highly recommended. Click HERE for information on how to scout whorl stage corn. The results of our trapping efforts are recorded by town on the table below with ECB-NY and ECB-IA moth counts shown. In some cases, there are multiple traps within a town. If you are a call-in grower or utilize pheromone monitoring on your own, your ECB traps should be up! and please report your numbers to me by Tuesday of each week. The data you all provide is very helpful to other growers as they make management decisions. 

European corn borer weekly summary, 6/23/2023 

Town 

# Traps 

Moth count 

(NY) 

Moth Count 

(IOWA) 

Milford 

4 

7 

0 

Peterborough 

2 

2 

0 

Antrim 

2 

0 

0 

Mason 

2 

0 

0 

Amherst 

2 

1 

0 

Litchfield 

4 

6 

1 

Hollis 

10 

19 

2 

Hudson 

2 

8 

0 

Goffstown 

2 

0 

0 

New Boston 

2 

0 

0 

Weare 

4 

0 

0 

Concord 

2 

2 

0 

Jaffrey 

2 

0 

0 

New Ipswich 

2 

0 

0 

Conway 

2 

0 

0 

Rollinsford 

2 

13 

0 

Meredith 

2 

0 

0 

Six Corn Earworm (CEW) moths were caught at one location in Hollis this week. Our IPM scout set out another CEW trap this week in corn at a susceptible growth stage (I.e. tassel). Remember that CEW damage is incurred when the crop is in silk. Even if you are at the CEW spray threshold, chemical intervention is not warranted if you’re not in silk. See below for CEW Spray thresholds (fresh silk) while using pheromone traps. 

Moths/week 

Moths/night 

Spray interval 

0.0-1.4 

0.0-0.2 

No spray 

1.5-3.5 

0.3-0.5 

Spray every 6 days 

3.6-7.0 

0.6-1.0 

Spray every 5 days 

7.1-91 

1.1-13.0 

Spray every 4 days 

91 + 

13+ 

Spray every 3 days 

We now have seven spotted wing drosophila (SWD) traps installed on four different farms and we will report out if we have any findings on next week’s IPM update. This week we saw no catch. Normally, we don’t see any major movement with SWD until late June/early July. 

Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) was quiet this week with zero catches. 

Squash vine borer (SVB) traps have been deployed in several towns, but we had zero official catch this week. We did receive a report from Claremont that two SVB moths were caught in a pheromone trap. The number of moths captured with pheromone traps can be used to decide whether or not an insecticide treatment is required. For bush-type summer squash and pumpkins (including giant pumpkins), the recommended threshold is 5 SVB moths per trap per week. For vining type squash or pumpkins, we suggest a threshold of 12 moths per trap per week. The difference is because vine-type cucurbits can root or tiller in at each node along the vine. This allows the plant to uptake water and nutrients from more than just the main stem. SVB tends to bore into the main stem of cucurbit plants, creating a higher risk for bush type plants. Future trapping data will be published on a town by town basis. 

Colorado potato beetle (CPB) larvae have been found on farms in Hillsborough County. We observed some eggs starting to hatch out in southern NH. Insecticide treatments for CPB will be most effective while they are in the larval stages. Remember that Colorado potato beetles can quickly build resistance to insecticides. Careful insecticide class rotation and non-chemical controls are needed to delay resistance. If you have applied insecticides to no effect, switch up the chemical class and do not use that class for the rest of the season. If possible, rotating off classes for two seasons would be best. For more information on CPB management click HERE. To see a list of chemicals approved for the use on tomato, click HERE  

Leek Moth has been detected in Grafton County this week. Leek moth was first detected in NH in 2016, and will likely become more common. For more leek moth resources Click Leek Moth in NH | Extension (unh.edu) for a just released pest alert. 

Check back in each week as the season progresses to see the latest trapping data. Data for additional insect pests will be updated on a weekly basis.Thank you to all the growers who participate in the program!  

Upcoming Meetings:  

June 27th, 2023 

June 29th, 2023 

July 5th, 2023 

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food integrated pest management program. This work is also supported in part by the Integrated Pest Management Crop Protection and Pest Management EIP grant no. 2021-70006-35477 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. 

 

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6/16/2023

Hello Vegetable IPM enthusiasts! 

European corn borer trap numbers are down in most locations this week, I suspect this is from insecticide applications. Colder regions of the state have just started to see emergence. Growers in colder areas should now scout for damage in whorl stage corn or later. We do have some farms with early corn that have reached tassel but overall, the cool temperatures have slowed development. Click HERE for information on how to scout whorl stage corn. The results of our trapping efforts are recorded by town on the table below with ECB-NY and ECB-IA moth counts shown. In some cases, there are multiple traps within a town. If you are a call-in grower or utilize pheromone monitoring on your own, your ECB traps should be up! and please report your numbers to me by Tuesday of each week. The data you all provide is very helpful to other growers as they make management decisions. It may be tempting to sidedress yellow, slow growing corn with additional nitrogen, but consider that temperatures likely have more to do with poor growth than nutrient status. 

European corn borer weekly summary, 6/16/2023 

Town 

# Traps 

Moth count (NY) 

Moth Count (IOWA) 

Milford 

4 

13 

0 

Antrim 

2 

6 

0 

Mason 

2 

2 

0 

Amherst 

2 

2 

0 

Litchfield 

4 

6 

0 

Hollis 

10 

22 

2 

Hudson 

2 

5 

0 

Goffstown 

2 

2 

0 

New Boston 

2 

7 

0 

Weare 

4 

1 

0

Concord 

2 

2 

0 

Jaffrey 

2 

0 

0 

New Ipswich 

2 

1 

0 

Conway 

2 

0 

0 

Rollinsford 

2 

4 

0 

We caught our first Corn Earworm (CEW) moths this week! Two moths were caught at a location in Hollis that had an early catch last year as well. Massachusetts has reported CEW moth catch this week too. We have not documented overwintering of CEW this far north, but seeing early catch in NH for a couple years in row makes me wonder. We typically observe CEW arriving on storm fronts in July. Documented overwintering is occurring as far up as New York, but our early numbers could point towards CEW overwintering farther north. More research is needed to determine if it is for sure occurring in our state. see below for CEW Spray thresholds while using pheromone traps. 

Moths/week 

Moths/night 

Spray interval 

0.0-1.4 

0.0-0.2 

No spray 

1.5-3.5 

0.3-0.5 

Spray every 6 days 

3.6-7.0 

0.6-1.0 

Spray every 5 days 

7.1-91 

1.1-13.0 

Spray every 4 days 

91 + 

13+ 

Spray every 3 days 

Four sFpotted wing drosophila (SWD) traps were installed last week and we will report out if we have any findings on next week’s IPM update. This week we saw no catch. Normally, we don’t see any major movement with SWD until late June/early July. 

Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) was quiet this week with zero catches. 

Squash vine borer (SVB) traps have been deployed in several towns, but we had zero catch this week. 

Future trapping data will be published on a town by town basis. 

 

Tomato plant with damage by Colorado potato beetle
Severe defoliation of tomato cause by Colorado potato beetle 

Colorado potato beetle adults were again found on farms in Hillsborough County. We observed some eggs starting to hatch out in southern NH. The cooler weather we have been having is restricting flight but the adults are still walking around and into fields to lay eggs. Remember that Colorado potato beetles can quickly build resistance to insecticides. Careful insecticide class rotation and non-chemical controls are needed to delay resistance. If you have applied insecticides to no effect, switch up the chemical class and do not use that class for the rest of the season. If possible, rotating off classes for two seasons would be best. For more information on CPB management click HERE. To see a list of chemicals approved for the use on tomato, click HERE  

Check back in each week as the season progresses to see the latest trapping data. Data for additional insect pests will be updated on a weekly basis.Thank you to all the growers who participate in the program!  

Upcoming Meetings:  

June 22nd, 2023 

June 27th, 2023 

 

Contact: Kyle Quigley 

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food integrated pest management program. This work is also supported in part by the Integrated Pest Management Crop Protection and Pest Management EIP grant no. 2021-70006-35477 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. 

 

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6/09/2023

Hello Vegetable IPM enthusiasts! 

European corn borer trap numbers are on the rise! One location in the southern part of the state caught 90 moths this past week. Of those 90 moths, all were of the New York strain. Growers in this area should scout for damage in whorl stage corn or later. We do have some farms with early corn that have reached pre tassel but overall, the cool temperatures have slowed development. Click HERE for information on how to scout whorl stage corn. The results of our trapping efforts are recorded by town on the table below with ECB-NY and ECB-IA moth counts shown. In some cases, there are multiple traps within a town. If you are a call-in grower or utilize pheromone monitoring on your own, your ECB traps should be up! Our next major pest of sweet corn that will be hitting the stage is corn earworm (CEW). Our IPM scout plans to start installing CEW traps next week. Parts of New York state have caught CEW adults this week, in areas where they can overwinter successfully. 

European corn borer weekly summary, 6/9/2023 

Town 

# of traps

Mouth Count 

(NY)

Moth Count

(IOWA) 

Milford 

4 

12 

0 

Antrim 

2 

0 

0 

Mason 

2 

1 

0 

Amherst 

2 

11 

0 

Litchfield 

4 

29 

1 

Hollis 

10 

120 

0 

Hudson 

2 

11 

0 

Goffstown 

2 

0 

0 

New Boston 

2 

0 

0 

Weare 

4 

0 

0 

Concord 

2 

1 

0 

Jaffrey 

2 

 0 

0 

Our first traps for spotted wing drosophila (SWD) were also installed this week and we will report out if we have any findings on next week’s IPM update. Normally, we don’t see any major movement with SWD until late June/early July. 

Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) was quiet this week with zero catches. 

Colorado potato beetle adults were again found on a farm in Hillsborough County. The cooler weather we have been having is restricting flight but the adults are still walking around and into fields to lay eggs. Remember that Colorado potato beetles can quickly build resistance to insecticides. careful insecticide class rotation and non-chemical controls are needed to delay resistance. for more information on CPB management click HERE 

Thrips damage has been observed in Onion within Hillsborough County. Damage can appear as gnarled, distorted leaves, silvery lines and white patches or brown tips. for more information on Onion Thrips, Click HERE.  

Thrip damage on an onion leaf
Close-up of heavy thrips feeding damage on an onion leaf 
Alton N. Sparks, Jr., University of Georgia, Bugwood.org 

Upcoming Meetings:  

June 14th, 2023 

June 22nd, 2023 

 

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food integrated pest management program. This work is also supported in part by the Integrated Pest Management Crop Protection and Pest Management EIP grant no. 2021-70006-35477 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. 

 

Contact: Kyle Quigley 

This program is made possible thought funding provided by the New Hampshire Departme